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 alone its later manifestation suggested by the ‘War on Terror’. Stone’s early life and career were dominated by the effects of Vietnam. Much later with Nixon (1995), Stone was still piecing together his personal and cinematic treatise on what the country and the conflict meant to himself and his fellow Americans –​and his work has returned to that territory and its wider Cold War ramifications time and again. However, there has been a shift too. His post-​9/​11 films, Alexander (2004), World Trade Center (2006), W. (2008) and Savages (2012) also had plenty to say about

in The cinema of Oliver Stone
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), and just some unknown capacity to spot the trends and desires of wider society which then can be communicated through a story or historical period, were no longer as much of a vital confluence as they once were in Stone’s filmmaking. Alexander (2004) and World Trade Center (2006) seemed perfectly in line with tastes and predilections for the return of the ‘sword-​and-​sandals’ historical epic and, after 2005, a harder-​edged, more resonant assessment of the nation five years on from 9/​11. These were productions that followed in the wake of successes such as Ridley

in The cinema of Oliver Stone
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within Hollywood did have an impact on Stone in the 2000s. In World Trade Center and W., the perspectives on 9/​11 and the Bush administration were remarked on for their lack of polemical bite. More visceral and acerbic critiques including War on Terror and Jawbreaker were developed, but ultimately faltered for want of available funding. This was certainly evidence of what Stone and many other observers saw as the prevailing neo-​conservative cultural narrative about the necessity and justification of the ‘War on Terror’. However, the mothballed scripts also provided

in The cinema of Oliver Stone
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certain times on television. For the last five to seven years everyone has been under pressure to make PG-​13 rather than R. World Trade Center was a PG-​13, which was a very violent movie about a grim subject. It was however a family-​oriented movie with good perceived values. The violence was modified so that the viewer does not see overly crushed limbs. There were heroic true stories, and so the film got a PG-​13 despite the violence. This move to PG-​13 is driven by commercial pressures. Studios will not make the movie if it has certain threatening elements in it

in The cinema of Oliver Stone
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4 Love Introduction I liked Heaven and Earth and Alexander for their tenderness. I dedicated both to my mother for that reason.1 With the exception of U Turn, all of my films have an aura of optimism about them. In World Trade Center it is feelings of family that help pull the people out of the hole. In W. Laura Bush is a binding force. In Wall Street love is also important. U Turn demonstrates the problem of isolation.2 In the opening scenes of Salvador (1986), Richard Boyle (James Woods) is arrested for multiple traffic offences and then bailed by his friend

in The cinema of Oliver Stone
Letter to M. Cavell about cinema (a remake)

the first moon landing, for example, or the destruction of the Berlin Wall, or the collapse of the World Trade Center towers, as each of them happened I had an experience that cannot be resurrected either by viewing those events on videotape or in any kind of dramatic recreation. But events like these are exceptional and certainly do not give us an understanding of what goes on

in Cinema, democracy and perfectionism