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Ian Scott and Henry Thompson

up as activism. Each of his films has been a piece of crafted drama with a range of distinctive attributes related to narrative and photography, acting as a baseline for Stone’s auteur brand. However, what is striking in the second period of his career is the way in which those core elements of the auteur brand did not merely become retroactive career artefacts for a media narrative that views his auteur heyday as belonging to the past. Instead, Stone’s auteurism acted as a platform for a political discourse that retained as much urgency and purpose as films such

in The cinema of Oliver Stone
Open Access (free)
Quentin Crisp as Orlando’s Elizabeth I
Glyn Davis

In 1992, Quentin Crisp appeared on cinema screens as Elizabeth I in Sally Potter's Orlando; the following year, he provided the 'Alternative Queen's Message' on Channel 4 television on Christmas Day, going head-to-head with Elizabeth II. This chapter will revisit this cultural moment, examining the significance of Crisp's perfonnances of 'queenliness'. The late 1980s/early 1990s heralded a shift away from the lesbian and gay politics of the 1970s and '80s towards a more confrontational queer activism. Orlando can be seen as an example of early queer cinema, given its play with gender and sexuality, and Potter's casting of Tilda Swinton (a regular collaborator of Derek Jannan). Other queer films of the time also unsettle and complicate particular moments in history, and equally employ a pointedly artificial mise-en-scene (Jannan's Edward II, Julien's Looking for Langston, Kalin's Swoon). How does Crisp's appearance - as an embodiment of the flaming, camp homosexual - complicate the film's politics of sexuality? Does it articulate a political ' clearing of the ground', with an older gay culture (Elizabeth) giving way to a fresh queer one (Orlando)? This chapter will consider the film as a provocative transition between particular forms of cultural production - bound up with changing attitudes towards the monarchy itself.

in The British monarchy on screen
One Billion Rising, dance and gendered violence
Dana Mills

Baltimore reflected on the event. They wrote: By performing the same choreographed moves to the official ‘One Billion Rising’ theme song, Break the Chain, Hopkins students became part of the global movement to demand an end to GBV.2 Historically, dance has been used a form of activism. However, only recently have people begun to see its power for global activism. Even today, some of the most conservative cultures in the world ban organized dance. It is feared, because it ignites the one thing that you cannot take away from a person: hope. (Branchinia et al. 2013

in Dance and politics
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The ethics and politics of memory in an age of mass culture
Alison Landsberg

people who hail from radically different backgrounds, and to foster the formation not necessarily of communities, but of political alliances across those differences. Cyberspace offers an arena in which large-scale, strategic alliances can be mobilised quickly and efficiently to enable political activism. For example, the Internet was crucial in coordinating the public demonstrations that interrupted the

in Memory and popular film
Open Access (free)
Civil rites of passage
Sharon Monteith

Sean French is one of a number of reviewers who fails even to recognise Chaney’s activism when he describes the murder of ‘two white civil rights workers and a local black man’. 20 FBI champions of civil rights are set against largely silent and passive black victims of segregation, when J. Edgar Hoover’s baiting of King and his dismissal of civil rights struggles is almost as well documented

in Memory and popular film
Open Access (free)
Ian Scott and Henry Thompson

. As Stone himself confessed, it was another way of meeting with, and handling, his political engagement. ‘The move to documentary work is an effort to put pressure where I can best put it, even if it’s a reduced impact,’ he explained.23 It is true that neither Comandante nor South of the Border generated anywhere near the tumult that accompanied the production and release of a movie such as JFK. That high watermark of activism in his career eventually saw Stone giving evidence in Congress to the Subcommittee on Legislation and National Security in April 1992

in The cinema of Oliver Stone
Open Access (free)
Mandy Merck

confrontational queer activism. With it came a ‘new queer cinema’ which transgressed received history in a pointedly artificial mise-en-scène (Isaac Julien’s 1989 Looking for Langston , Derek Jarman’s 1991 Edward II , Tom Kalin’s 1992 Swoon ). Orlando can be seen as a prime example of queer cinema, given its play with gender and sexuality and the choice of Jarman collaborator Tilda Swinton for the title role. In casting the

in The British monarchy on screen
Open Access (free)
Ian Scott and Henry Thompson

Garrison’s personal account of his attempts to secure a conviction in the case, the film pieces together his inquiry into pro-​Cuban activism in his home city of New Orleans in the years up to Kennedy’s death, leading him to Lee Harvey Oswald by way of Clay Shaw, FBI employee, New Orleans policeman and private investigator Guy Banister, pilot David Ferrie and other assorted malcontents.17 Inspired in the film by a meeting with an unnamed government official who tells Garrison on a trip to Washington, DC of some of the unexplained events in government circles going on

in The cinema of Oliver Stone