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John Lydgate’s ‘Soteltes for the coronation banquet of Henry VI’
Heather Blatt

Girouard, Life in the English country house: a social and architectural history (New Haven: Yale University Press, 1994), 33. For the sacral borrowings of Westminster Hall, see Christopher Wilson, ‘Rulers, artificers, and shoppers: Richard II’s remodelling of Westminster Hall, 1393–99’, in The regal image of Richard II and the Wilton Diptych, ed. Dillian Gordon, Lisa Monnas, and Caroline Elam (Coventry: Harvey Miller, 1997), 33–59. (In contrast, the now-destroyed Archbishop’s Palace at Canterbury, itself the location of significant feasts, measured 126 by 42 feet – half

in Participatory reading in late-medieval England
Open Access (free)
The wall texts of a Percy family manuscript and the Poulys Daunce of St Paul’s Cathedral
Heather Blatt

not only the national and religious elites of king and pope, ladies and abbesses, but also the civic and familial members of society, from mayors to artificers and servants.56 The architecture of the space functions with the text to create a landing site that elicits such connections, even as the environment of St Paul’s – audible to those in the Pardon Churchyard to view Poulys Daunce, and known to those familiar with the city – still furthered readers making such connections. As readers confronted the Poulys Daunce, these details of the landing site of cloister

in Participatory reading in late-medieval England