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Lesbian citizenship and filmmaking in Sweden in the 1970s
Ingrid Ryberg

lesbian filmmaking was inserted into the National Board of Health and Welfare’s budget and administered as an issue of birth control education. Looking closer at the two films’ representation of lesbianism, noting how they downplay sexual desire, I argue that rather than simply exemplifying the transnational lesbian feminist movement’s alleged anti-​ sex politics, this articulation of lesbian identity should be understood as shaped by the interaction with official sexual policymaking in Sweden at this crucial moment in time. These neglected films and their production

in The power of vulnerability
Johanna Gondouin
,
Suruchi Thapar-Björkert
, and
Ingrid Ryberg

and decisions of those who are considering surrogacy (Riggs and Due, 2010; 2013; van den Akker et al., 2016), as well as surrogacy law and policy (Millbank, 2012). In Western feminist thought, the notion of reproductive rights, centred around values such as choice and bodily autonomy, have primarily regarded the right to access birth control such as contraceptives and abortion. However, in the current context of declining fertility rates in the Global North, reproduction is increasingly valued (Eng, 2010), and new reproductive technologies (ARTs) enable new claims

in The power of vulnerability
Open Access (free)
White male vulnerability as heterosexual fantasy
Susanna Paasonen

submission and domination for the reversal of or play with roles. Consequently, scenes of female submission and male domination are mapped onto a gendered dynamic of unequal social status and agency, where Christian’s desire for control extends beyond the ‘red room of pain’ to the details of Anastasia’s diet, exercise, birth control and social life. His tendencies for stalking and jealousy are depicted as ultimately in her best interest, while possessiveness and jealousy translate as love and commitment. In this sense, the books explicitly prop up the gendered hierarchies

in The power of vulnerability
The ambivalence of queer visibility in audio- visual archives
Dagmar Brunow

Welfare in 1977, remarkably enough from its budget for birth control education. When Eva and Maria was screened in Japan at a UNESCO health conference, it was distributed alongside guidelines for teaching, which state: Homosexuals often feel that, rather than their sexual or emotional preferences being problematic, the attitudes in the surrounding world cause difficulties … The few times homosexuality is represented in media, criminality and illness are often part of the picture. We want to turn the debate to focus on homophobia (fear of homosexuals) instead. (Ryberg

in The power of vulnerability