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The Aid Industry and the ‘Me Too’ Movement
Charlotte Lydia Riley

’ ( Guardian , 2018 ). It is not that everyone within NGOs refuses to accept that this problem exists or its potential severity, but Goldring’s comments demonstrate a tendency among white, male, middle-class figures who are senior in these organisations – who are unlikely themselves to be the target of sexual harassment, abuse or intimidation – to downplay the risk of this occurring and to respond to accusations slowly and reluctantly. British

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Swati Mehta Dhawan
and
Julie Zollmann

Humanitarian actors touting financial inclusion posit that access to financial services builds refugees’ resilience and self-reliance. They claim that new digital financial tools create more efficient and dignified pathways for humanitarian assistance and enable refugees to better manage their savings and invest in livelihoods, especially during protracted displacement. Our in-depth, repeat interviews with refugees in Kenya and Jordan refute this narrative. Instead, self-reliance was hindered primarily by refugees’ lack of foundational rights to move and work. Financial services had limited ability to support livelihoods in the absence of those rights. The digital financial services offered to refugees under the banner of ‘financial inclusion’ were not mainstream services designed to empower and connect. Instead, they were segregated, second-class offerings meant to further isolate and limit refugee transactions in line with broader political desires to encamp and exclude them. The article raises questions about the circumstances in which humanitarian funding ought to fund financial service interventions and what those interventions are capable of achieving.

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Middle-Aged Syrian Women’s Contributions to Family Livelihoods during Protracted Displacement in Jordan
Dina Sidhva
,
Ann-Christin Zuntz
,
Ruba al Akash
,
Ayat Nashwan
, and
Areej Al-Majali

Introduction ‘In Syria, I was always like, bring me this, bring me that.’ Before the Syrian conflict, 38-year-old Marwa 1 lived in various working-class neighbourhoods in Damascus, sheltered by her parents and, later, by her husband. At the age of 17, Marwa dropped out of high school to get married to a tradesman and thereafter never left the house unaccompanied. Seven years after the family fled to Jordan, we met with Marwa in Al Hashmi Al

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Phoebe Shambaugh
and
Bertrand Taithe

role of ongoing knowledge production in biomedical and public health fields as defining features of the pandemic response. However, his analysis highlights the importance of social factors, notably ‘the intersections of questions of race, class and power with public health interventions’ as key mediators in the success of health responses. Questions of biopolitics and power loom over the discussions of public health interventions, especially in the call to consider the possibility of a plague

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
1980–2000
Dominique Marshall

‘Central America’, displayed reproductions of images from the IDPL, including some by renowned Canadian photographers like Dilip Metha, accompanied by the words of writers and the editor-in-chief. ‘We also made maps by continent, we had … Africa, Asia and the Americas,’ recounted Marc Rockbrune. ‘We also had a silent map. It was just the outline of the world and the educators could work in class with a map on which there was just the outline, you didn’t see the countries. It was an interesting tool’ ( ACDI, 1986 ; CIDA, 1988 ; Canadian Geographic Education, 2008

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Gender Equality and Culture in Humanitarian Action 1
Ricardo Fal-Dutra Santos

. Moreover, important topics or questions remain to be explored by further research, including the practical ways in which humanitarianism can engage in gender-transformative action, its complementarity to the longstanding work of feminist activists, and the relationship between humanitarian action and other cultural identity factors, such as race, ethnicity, class, caste, age, disability and legal status. Definitions Building on Enloe (2004 : 4

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Róisín Read

.1080/13552074.2019.1664046 . Martin de Almagro , M. ( 2017 ), ‘ Producing Participants: Gender, Race, Class, and Women, Peace and Security ’, Global Society , 1 – 20 , published online 11 October, doi: 10.1080/13600826.2017.1380610 . Martínez , S. and Libal , K. ( 2011 ), ‘ Introduction: The Gender of

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Humanity and Solidarity
Tanja R. Müller
and
Róisín Read

working-class women adopt in exile in Jordan, the article carefully interrogates shifting gender and power dynamics. In doing so it questions the fashionable humanitarian focus on self-reliance and entrepreneurship, as well as youth, but demonstrates how individual and family well-being often relies on rather different parameters. A better understanding among humanitarian actors of what refugee women themselves perceive as valuable lives would be a welcome step in advancing gendered aspirations

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
From the Global to the Local
Elena Fiddian-Qasmiyeh

making and planning pre-dating Trump. Costs associated with school books and other materials will invariably be prohibitive for many, especially families with multiple school-aged children, and yet this is only one of many pressures limiting education systems and more concretely children’s experiences of school and learning. For instance, the eight-year-old daughter of one of my interviewees attends a double-shift UNRWA school in North Lebanon, where she is one of more than 50 children in her class. 13 As an UNRWA science teacher noted, it

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Corporations, Celebrities and the Construction of the Entrepreneurial Refugee Woman
Annika Bergman Rosamond
and
Catia Gregoratti

, however, the refugee woman’s insertion into paid labour markets is depicted as a solution to the multiple problems ranging from the traumas of war, gender-based violence, rape and displacement to economic hardship. Such market-based solutions are actively created and dependent on a privileged class of Northern – and often private – humanitarian saviours as well as compassionate consumers who may purchase the products that are manufactured within the initiatives. What is

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs