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Contextualising colonial and post-colonial nursing
Helen Sweet and Sue Hawkins

further, delving into the immediate post-colonial phases, again bringing race, cultural differences and gender back into the discussion. These chapters also introduce pioneering methodologies relatively new to the study of nursing history, including quantitative analysis of collective biographies. Colonialism applied to nursing’s history In Medicine and Colonial Identity, Mary Sutphen and Bridie Andrews described the challenge of trying to understand and study colonialism because the ‘crass lumping of colonial subjects by an imperial power and the local subjectivity of

in Colonial caring
Colonialism and Native Health nursing in New Zealand, 1900–40
Linda Bryder

in impoverished communities, which accentuated the health problems they had to deal with. Despite the best efforts of those who initiated the Native Nursing scheme and the nurses who serviced it, the roots of Māori ill health lay in structural economic circumstances, including poor housing. Nevertheless, this does not diminish the endeavours of the nurses themselves, and nor should they be seen 98 Native Health nursing in New Zealand as simply agents of the State imposing Western values on colonial subjects. These nurses soon learned that healthcare was not a

in Colonial caring
Open Access (free)
Benoît Majerus and Joris Vandendriessche

, which was tied to a relative ‘indifference’ towards the colony, left all the room to private players such as religious missions, industrial companies and universities to develop health programmes and infrastructure. One of the implications of this indifference was that for a long time Belgian state citizenship remained inaccessible for colonial subjects – who Au and Cornet suggest were rather treated as

in Medical histories of Belgium
Open Access (free)
Sokhieng Au and Anne Cornet

Belgians. Certainly this was true before the Second World War, but even the debut of indigenous identification cards in 1948 still explicitly delimited the non-Belgianness of its carriers: Africans were either colonial subjects or Belgians of colonial status . These lands would never become ‘Greater Belgium’, even if there existed some propaganda by pro-colonialists agitating for

in Medical histories of Belgium