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Felix Kanitz and Balkan archaeology
Vladimir V. Mihajlović

numerous issues connected with the political and economic instability in the Ottoman Empire, in order to maintain the fragile balance-of-power system on the continent. Being the Ottoman Empire’s closest neighbour among the Great Powers, Austria (from 1867 Austria-Hungary) was particularly interested in the possibility of seizing power over the Balkan lands hitherto under Ottoman control. Thus, the foreign politics of AustriaHungary in this part of Europe could be labelled ‘frontier colonialism’. The Dual Monarchy’s colonial efforts were directed towards its own frontiers

in Communities and knowledge production in archaeology
Open Access (free)
Clusters of knowledge
Julia Roberts and Kathleen Sheppard

, 2007; Orser, 2004; Dyson, 2004, 2006; Hicks and Beaudry, 2006), ensuring that historians and practitioners of archaeology get a more well-rounded view of the whole field, as opposed to a snapshot at a distinct period. Egyptology has, unsurprisingly, proved to be a productive area of enquiry with a very particular history, one which has enormous public appeal in the form of both broader histories (e.g. Thompson, 2015) and more specific explorations into particular episodes of colonialism, education, field practice, biography and mummy studies (MacDonald and Rice, 2003

in Communities and knowledge production in archaeology
Open Access (free)
Jes Wienberg

. Aronsson 2004 ; Nielsen 2010 ; Harrison 2013 ). In more general terms, a great deal of attention shifted from the past in itself to the past in the present and therefore from source criticism to perspective criticism. Even so, this criticism may itself be seen as a new way of using of the past in the present. This criticism has often focused on how the past has been used by nationalism, colonialism, imperialism, tourism, and other “isms”: how selection, interpretation, and mediation have been shaped according to the needs of the present; how the past has been used

in Heritopia
Open Access (free)
Displaying the dead
Melanie Giles

here by John Berger ( 1984 : 21), who argued (in a thesis on poetry) that we should hold out the promise that ‘what has been experienced cannot disappear as if it has never been’. The dead may no longer ‘care’ if they were a sacrifice or execution at the time of Roman conquest but we should because it tells us about the experience of colonialism here on the ground. Exhibitions of the dead need this poetic tenet. If one of the purposes of a museum is not merely to collect, curate and conserve for some endlessly deferred future, but to challenge, inspire curiosity and

in Bog bodies
Open Access (free)
Jes Wienberg

change, a modernisation of heritage. The faces of modernity Words such as modern, modernisation, modernism, and modernity occur everywhere in narratives of human development. They deal with the triumph of progress, enlightenment, rationality, and science, the triumph of individualism, capitalism, urbanisation, industrialisation, and globalisation. But these narratives have been criticised for as long as they have been put forward, and their critics have stressed the dark and destructive reverse side of modernity – alienation, disenchantment, colonialism, genocide

in Heritopia
Open Access (free)
Jes Wienberg

concept is constantly becoming relevant to new areas or seeping into closely related fields: heritage is combined with such words as archaeology, art, canon, church, colonialism, commercialism, conservation, criminality, democracy, development, development-assistance policy, economics, education, environment, ethics, forests, future, globalisation, politics of memory, history, human rights, identity, identity policy, landscape, legislation, management, memory, modernity(!), museums, nationalism, peace-building, politics, quality of life, religion, religious services

in Heritopia
The fate of Namibian skulls in the Alexander Ecker Collection in Freiburg
Reinhart Kößler

This article explores the history of the Alexander Ecker Collection and situates it within the larger trajectory of global collecting of human remains during the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. This is then linked to the specific context of the genocide in then German South West Africa (1904–8), with the central figure of Eugen Fischer. The later trajectory of the collection leads up to the current issues of restitution. The Freiburg case is instructive since it raises issues about the possibilities and limitations of provenance research. At the same time, the actual restitution of fourteen human remains in 2014 occurred in a way that sparked serious conflict in Namibia which is still on-going four years later. In closing, exigencies as well as pressing needs in connection with the repatriation and (where possible) rehumanisation of human remains are discussed.

Human Remains and Violence: An Interdisciplinary Journal