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Mobilising affect in feminist, queer and anti-racist media cultures

The power of vulnerability interrogates the new language of vulnerability that has emerged in feminist, queer and anti-racist debates about the production, use and meanings of media. The book investigates the historical legacies and contemporary forms and effects of this language. In today’s media culture, traumatic first-person or group narratives have popular currency, mobilising affect from compassion to rage to gain cultural visibility and political advantage. In this context, vulnerability becomes a kind of capital, a resource or an asset that can and has been appropriated for various groups and purposes in public discourses, activism as well as cultural institutions. Thus, politics of representation translates into politics of affect, and the question about whose vulnerability counts as socially and culturally legible and acknowledged. The contributors of the book examine how vulnerability has become a battleground; how affect and vulnerability have turned into a politicised language for not only addressing but also obscuring asymmetries of power; and how media activism and state policies address so-called vulnerable groups. While the contributors investigate the political potential as well as the constraints of vulnerability for feminist, queer and antiracist criticism, they also focus on the forms of agency and participation vulnerability can offer.

Open Access (free)
Don’t Ever Wipe Tears Without Gloves as a reparative fantasy
Anu Koivunen

[Torka aldrig tårar utan handskar], scripted by Gardell and directed by Simon Kaijser, had immense success in Sweden. When Swedish public service television SVT aired the three-​ part drama series in October 2012, 1.2 million viewers, a third of the adult population, were seated for the premiere, and #torkaaldrigtårar trended on Twitter. Both the novel  –​which sold over 100,000 copies  –​and the TV series received a very favourable public reception and exceptional  218 218 Vulnerability and cultural policy media coverage in the national media, crossing over

in The power of vulnerability
The ambivalence of queer visibility in audio- visual archives
Dagmar Brunow

as museums, galleries or archives, have been increasingly attempting to acknowledge LGBTQ pasts, often guided by diversity policies (Axelsson and Åkerö, 2016; National Trust, 2017; Sandell and Nightingale, 2012; Steorn, 2012). They are some of the stakeholders in the process of heritage construction during which different interest groups * This study was funded by the Swedish Research Council.  176 176 Vulnerability and cultural policy negotiate political recognition (Smith, 2007). Creating visibility for previously hidden narratives is based ‘on the premise

in The power of vulnerability
Open Access (free)
Lesbian citizenship and filmmaking in Sweden in the 1970s
Ingrid Ryberg

in the 1970s and 1980s. Undertaking a close reading of the two films’ funding processes in this chapter, I  investigate the ambiguous sexual citizenship (Bell and Binnie, 2000; Evans, 1993) shaped by the interplay between formal sexual policymaking and lesbian film production in Sweden at a moment in time when  196 196 Vulnerability and cultural policy homosexuality was on the threshold of becoming recognised as a civil rights issue. Drawing from original archival research and interviews, I shed light on the rhetorical twists and euphemisms through which

in The power of vulnerability
The failure and success of a Swedish film diversity initiative
Mara Lee Gerdén

notion of quality informing Swedish film policy since the 1960s, and a Swedish self-​image expressed as a need to ‘implement Swedish values’. In what follows, I  discuss the paradox that arises when, paraphrasing Audre Lorde, the master actually summons you to dismantle his house (Lorde, 1996). While launched in the name of advancing diversity in Swedish  152 152 Vulnerability and cultural policy film, there was a clear tension between the quality film rhetoric of the Swedish Film Institute and the participants’ insistence on making race play a major role in the

in The power of vulnerability
Open Access (free)
Putting the countryside back to work
David Calder

more diffuse cultural spending. Thus France’s regional cities largely pursued the policies established by Malraux. In the 1980s, Jack Lang, Minister of Culture to Mitterrand, substantially revised the Malraux model of cultural decentralization to foster the development of previously unfunded, popular forms. Subsequent 70 Working memories commentators describe the shift from Malraux to Lang as the shift from Culture (singular, with a capital C) to cultures (plural, lowercase, and mutable). Animation and création became buzzwords of Socialist cultural policy. Both

in Street theatre and the production of postindustrial space
Anu Koivunen, Katariina Kyrölä and Ingrid Ryberg

’s contextuality and explore how exactly injury and agency, pain and power, work together when vulnerability is mobilised in the public imagination, in mediated debates, and cultural policies. Our purpose is not to argue for vulnerability as the best or extraordinarily useful concept or tool for critical research, nor against vulnerability as a concept or a starting point for activist efforts. Rather, we approach vulnerability both as a concept and a political language, offering analyses of its histories, legacies, power, and potential as well as problems in the wider social and

in The power of vulnerability
Open Access (free)
Continuous theatre for a creative city
David Calder

proposed by Diana Taylor, La Machine attempts to present itself as the inheritor of industrial savoir-faire passed down directly from the Nantes shipbuilding industry. When these attempts succeed, La Machine is able to justify its presence in the repurposed metal fabrication shops. When they fail, La Machine’s workshop is vilified in letters to the local paper as a force of gentrification and a tourist trap, and by extension Nantes’ cultural policy priorities are called into question. In the first half of this chapter I demonstrated the built, discursive, and embodied

in Street theatre and the production of postindustrial space