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Steve Sohmer

a nod from William Shakespeare to Christopher Marlowe and his Hero and Leander (2.176). 2 In 1925 Leslie Hotson’s discovery of documents related to Marlowe’s violent death revived interest in the poet’s presence in the play. 3 In May of the same year Oliver W. F. Lodge identified Touchstone’s ‘it strikes a man more dead than a great

in Reading Shakespeare’s mind
Steve Sohmer

predecessor, Sir John Oldcastle (d. 1417), for the misleader of Prince Hal in 1 Henry IV (1596). (See the discussion of the Oldcastle contretemps in ‘Shakespeare’s bad timing’ in Longer notes’ below.) In August 1596 Brooke succeeded Henry Carey as Lord Chamberlain; he briefly held the post until his death in March 1597, at which time Carey’s son, George

in Reading Shakespeare’s mind
Steve Sohmer

. We do not know the date of his death; we lose sight of him after the publication of Nashes Lenten Stuffe and the burning of his and Harvey’s books in the summer of 1599. 5 The consensus holds that Nashe died in the interval 1599–1601. Though he had been forbidden to publish, somehow Nashe’s Summer’s Last Will and Testament , written in 1592

in Reading Shakespeare’s mind
Steve Sohmer

Toby’s mock-carol is only one of the play’s calendrical pranks? Finally, suppose I could persuade you that Shakespeare’s comedy about fraternal twins (with the boy believed lost at sea and drowned) is the playwright’s attempt to reconcile himself to the death of his only son? If I could do all that, it would change the way you (and the rest of us) think about Twelfth Night

in Reading Shakespeare’s mind
Steve Sohmer

set Olivia mourning for the death of her brother only, instead she has both a father and brother lost, as had Elizabeth in Henry VIII (d. 1547) and Edward VI (d. 1553). How Feste got his name ‘Feste’ is a Shakespearean nonce-word in which commentators have long recognized a hint of ‘festive’, ‘feast’, or ‘festival’, an

in Reading Shakespeare’s mind
Steve Sohmer

seventeenth anniversary of the twins’ baptism. By age eleven Hamnet was dead. Whether the cause of the boy’s death was accident or illness – or did he perhaps drown in the River Avon? – is unknown. The parallels between the real and fictional fraternal twins are simply too pointed and poignant to ignore. Did Shakespeare recognize in his Judith flashes of his lost Hamnet? In Sebastian

in Reading Shakespeare’s mind
Steve Sohmer

punishment weighs down upon you. You are the devil’s gateway; you are she who first violated the forbidden tree and broke the law of God. It was you who coaxed your way around him [Adam] whom the devil had not the force to attack. With what ease you shattered that image of God: Man! Because of the death you merited, even the Son of God

in Reading Shakespeare’s mind
Steve Sohmer

’s death, but he was buried on 11 August, the height of summer; did he drown while swimming in the River Avon? Recovering the link between the reunion of Viola with a brother believed dead and the anniversary of the christening of the playwright’s own twins casts a patina of bereavement over the conclusion of Shakespeare’s Twelfth Night that

in Reading Shakespeare’s mind
Open Access (free)
Behind the screen
Chloe Porter

important to refer to an ‘impasse’ in this context because that is how mortal limitations are understood in early modern thought. That death is an unmoveable imposition is, for example, suggested by Henry Peacham’s Terminus emblem in his Minerva Britanna ( figure 28 ). Here, Jove is depicted in the process of failing to dislodge the ‘pillar high’ that is named ‘ Terminus

in Making and unmaking in early modern English drama
Open Access (free)
Imitation of Spenserian satire
Rachel E. Hile

6 After the Bishops’ Ban: imitation of Spenserian satire Spenser’s death in 1599, the promulgation of the Bishops’ Ban in 1599, and the death of Queen Elizabeth in 1603—each of these could be expected to affect the writing of poetry in England, with Spenser’s influence becoming modified by nostalgia, authors trying to interpret the text of the Bishops’ Ban to determine how to respond to its directive “That noe Satyres or Epigramms be printed hereafter” (qtd. in McCabe, “Elizabethan satire,” 188), and everyone watching to see what degree of oversight of the

in Spenserian satire