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Charles V. Reed

the production behind the scenes. While her resistance to part with her children and grandchildren was likely personal, particularly after the death of Albert, rather than an act of rebellion against her own political impotence, she either truly believed herself to be the master of the monarchy or simply could not accept the purely symbolic role that later monarchs would embrace. As for the royal

in Royal tourists, colonial subjects and the making of a British world, 1860–1911
Edward M. Spiers

ranks turned about: ‘For about ten minutes’, wrote Marling, ‘it was touch and go, but we beat them off & every nigger who got inside was killed. Our loss was very heavy, 9 officers and 66 men killed, 9 officers and 72 wounded.’ 37 Trafford was mightily impressed by the ‘glorious sight’ of the Arab charge: ‘one thought they were charging to certain death yet they not only reached the square but

in The Victorian soldier in Africa
Harold Moody and the League of Coloured Peoples
David Killingray

his death in 1947 – it was a Sisyphean struggle. Perhaps most hurtful to Moody was the lack of sympathetic understanding of his cause from his close associates in the London Missionary Society on whose councils he sat. Middle-class whites knew nothing of the slights and rebuffs that their confident black colleague and fellow Christian had experienced. Even less could they envisage what it was like to be a

in West Indian intellectuals in Britain
War memorials, memory and imperial knowledge
Katie Pickles

World War scenes, the collection of suitable representations included heroes and heroic deaths, such as The Death of Wolfe in the British conquest of Quebec by American artist Benjamin West. Writing on Canadian national dreams, Daniel Francis calls this picture ‘a monument to historical fabrication’. 22 Indeed, in such collections French Canadian and aboriginal figures appeared only in support of

in Female imperialism and national identity
Open Access (free)
Edward M. Spiers

221 men wounded), but in the hospital throughout the siege only 59 of the wounded died compared with 510 deaths from typhoid and dysentery. 26 Men clearly weakened as the siege dragged on and provisions became increasingly scarce. By February 1900 Devonshire soldiers recorded both the escalating prices at auction – £25 for a bottle of whisky, 10 s (50p) to £10 for tins of condensed milk, 22 s 6 d (£1

in The Victorian soldier in Africa
Open Access (free)
Edward M. Spiers

harmless farmers, but they are worse than savages, and armed as well as us’. 10 Many soldiers took a keen interest in how their exploits were reported in the newspapers but had ambivalent feelings about the war correspondents. While regimental officers often enjoyed their company (see chapter 8 ), bemoaned their absence ( chapter 6 ) or grieved over the death of the

in The Victorian soldier in Africa
Charles V. Reed

following the death of Princess Diana (1997). The tabloid press, an invention of the nineteenth century, also contributed to these processes of trivialisation. 12 Philip Murphy persuasively argues that she symbolises and personifies the Commonwealth. Monarchy and the End of Empire: The House of Windsor, the British Government, and

in Royal tourists, colonial subjects and the making of a British world, 1860–1911
Open Access (free)
Edward M. Spiers

enthusiasm at home. Indeed the newspapers, at least latterly, were preoccupied with the assassination of the Tsar and the death of Benjamin Disraeli. 2 To attack Sekhukhune, Wolseley assembled a formidable composite force, comprising the 2/21st and the 94th (2/Connaught Rangers), with two companies of the 80th, four guns, a party of Royal Engineers with explosives, a troop of mounted volunteers under

in The Victorian soldier in Africa
Matthew M. Heaton

repatriating him to Nigeria. It was presumed that L.L. was fit to travel, but he made a ruckus on the voyage, causing Nigerian officials to note when he arrived that ‘his behaviour en route to Lagos suggests … that he is still liable to fits and is of a violent nature’. 32 Later, in 1950, Elder Dempster noted that ‘two recent deaths’ of mental patients en route from the UK to their homes in

in Beyond the state
Open Access (free)
Bill Schwarz

his wife again; was never to see his daughter; and he never returned to the Caribbean. This represents a particular variant on the theme of emigration which underwrites the story of twentieth-century Caribbean intellectuals. From 1929 to 1933 Padmore energetically devoted himself to the ideals of Soviet Communism, rising high in the firmament of the Communist administration; thereafter, until his death

in West Indian intellectuals in Britain