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A trialogue
Sybille Lammes, Kate McLean and Chris Perkins

And you don’t know how comprehend our very human your practice is going to relationship with urban olfac- change in a year’s time because you don’t know tory landscapes. what the smellers will enjoy and how that will Yeah, so as far as I’m con- alter your practice? cerned, the practice is open source. If somebody else wants to go out and do it as well, I would love to see the results. Mapping the quixotic volatility of smellscapes 89 Traditional maps are rendered in two dimensions; digital technologies afford us the options of mapping in four dimensions, but I

in Time for mapping
The case for practice theory
Matthew Hanchard

technological configurations of digital maps, and the entanglement with social practices, digital maps are increasingly ubiquitous through a complicated range of possible media. At times, this can negate meaningful analysis of digital map use through data alone: a digital map can be printed out and shoved in a back pocket, committed to memory, used as a back-up resource (just in case), or used in combination with a guide book or local knowledge. In turn, there is increasing complexity and challenge in grappling empirically with digital technology use beyond online-only web

in Time for mapping
Open Access (free)
Back to the future
Alex Gekker, Sam Hind, Sybille Lammes, Chris Perkins and Clancy Wilmott

process. New digital technologies also afforded us the chance to enact specific rhythms in the writing process. We worked quickly on this book as editors, by organising a series of book-sprints in remote areas in the United Kingdom and the Netherlands, as well as across digital and virtual time-spaces. During this process, we collaborated on editing chapters simultaneously and jointly – composing the conclusion and introduction in shared Google Docs, watching and over-writing each other’s work. How we, during a shared yet sometimes haphazard time frame of days, hours or

in Time for mapping
Open Access (free)
Mapping times
Alex Gekker, Sam Hind, Sybille Lammes, Chris Perkins and Clancy Wilmott

-jetting’ practice (Joliveau, 2009). By the 1980s, digital mapping had slowly begun to supplant the dominance of printed maps, albeit in ways that were much less ephemeral than contemporary applications: technologies were deployed on desktops to fix and freeze possible futures, a means to an instrumental end. Affordances remained static – paper maps were increasingly made by deploying digital technologies, with users discernible from producers, in space and time. Maps were mobile things that could be deployed in different places, but the people deploying them were separate from

in Time for mapping