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Eric Pudney

Modern Kent: Stereotypes and the Background to Accusations’, in New Perspectives on Witchcraft, Magic, and Demonology, vol. 3, edited by Brian Levack (New York: Routledge, 2001), pp. 173–203 (pp. 182–85). 10 Gareth Roberts, ‘The Descendants of Circe: Witches and Renaissance Fictions’, in Witchcraft in Early Modern Europe: Studies in Culture and Belief, edited by Jonathan Barry, Marianne Hester, and Gareth Roberts (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1996), pp. 183–206 (p. 186). Introduction 5 used to inspire new, and more explicitly fictional, works of literature

in Scepticism and belief in English witchcraft drama, 1538–1681
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Speaking pictures?
Chloe Porter

recognition of painting as the supreme model of mimetic representation. 20 In early modern Europe, circulating alongside the notion of ut pictura poesis were the paragone (‘comparison’) debates, which revolved around the struggle for superiority amongst modes of representation. 21 The paragone were known to English playwrights in this period and shape a number of dramatic treatments of

in Making and unmaking in early modern English drama
Eric Pudney

at least a semblance of certainty. The most illustrious example of the philosophical use of scepticism is found in the work of René 8 Walter Stephens, ‘The Sceptical Tradition’, in The Oxford Handbook of Witchcraft in Early Modern Europe and Colonial America, edited by Brian Levack (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2013), pp. 101–21 (p. 105). 9 Popkin, p. 10. Scepticism in the Renaissance 13 Descartes. In his Meditations on First Philosophy (1641), Descartes doubted all the evidence of his senses, stripping away all knowledge that could conceivably be doubted

in Scepticism and belief in English witchcraft drama, 1538–1681
The ends of incompletion
Chloe Porter

cannot tell what All new fashyons, be plesaunt to me. (sig. A3v) Boorde’s depiction of an Englishman obsessed with different styles of clothing intersects with anxieties about dress and the instability of national identity widespread in early modern Europe. 47 Since ‘foreign cloth’ was seen as ‘sinister in its power to undermine England

in Making and unmaking in early modern English drama
The Show from street to print
Tracey Hill

.161 Notes I am particularly indebted to Ian Gadd and Richard Rowland for their comments and advice on this chapter. 1 Michael Burden’s discussion of the post-Restoration Shows is an exception in this respect (see ‘“For the lustre of the subject”’). 2 ‘Occasional events’, p. 180; my emphasis. As Watanabe-O’Kelly has cogently argued in relation to continental triumphs, ‘festival books are . . . not simple records of a festival, but another element in it’ (‘Early modern European festivals’, p. 23). 3 ‘King James’s civic pageant’, p. 230; ‘Making meaning’, p. 63. 4

in Pageantry and power
Open Access (free)
Simon Smith, Jackie Watson and Amy Kenny

Modern Europe, ed. by Claire Richter Sherman (Carlisle, PA: Trout Gallery & Folger Shakespeare Library, 2000), pp. 35–45 (p. 37); Lindley, p. 67.   4 It is relatively unusual to find an image framing musical notation in place of an address to the reader or a dedication. Thomas Coryate’s playful venture into travel writing, Coryats Crudities (1611), includes a song that praises his achievements through favourable and extended comparison to ‘a Porcupen’ (E6v), thus framing a written text with a musical paratext. Whilst sharing our 1563 psalter’s interest in non

in The senses in early modern England, 1558–1660
The unknowable image in The Winter’s Tale
Chloe Porter

does not discuss the context of monumental imagery in detail in ‘Imagine Me, Gentle Spectators’, p. 375. 53 Cynthia Lawrence, ‘Introduction’, in Cynthia Lawrence (ed.), Women and Art in Early Modern Europe: Patrons, Collectors and Connoisseurs (University Park: Pennsylvania State University

in Making and unmaking in early modern English drama
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Reading practices and participation in digital and medieval media
Heather Blatt

modern Europe (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1989), 141–73. 18 For particular discussions and summaries of the work on literacy rates in late-medieval England, see Susan Crane, ‘The writing lesson of 1381’, Chaucer’s England: literature in historical context, ed. Barbara A. Hanawalt (Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 1992), 201–23, at 202; Judy Ann Ford, John Mirk’s Festial: Orthodoxy, Lollardy and the common people in fourteenth-century England (Cambridge: D.S. Brewer, 2006), 26–8. 19 Alastair Minnis remains the authority on this subject; see

in Participatory reading in late-medieval England
David Colclough

Boesky, ‘Bacon’s New Atlantis and the laboratory of prose’, in Elizabeth Fowler and Roland Greene (eds), The Project of Prose in Early Modern Europe and the New World (Cambridge, Cambridge University Press, 1997), pp. 138–53. 23 Charles Whitney, ‘Merchants of Light: science as colonization in the New Atlantis’, in William A. Sessions (ed.), Francis Bacon’s Legacy of Texts: ‘The Art of Discovery Grows with Discovery’ (New York, AMS Press, 1990), pp. 255–68; p. 256. So determined is Whitney to read the New Atlantis into a transhistorical colonialist narrative that he

in Francis Bacon’s New Atlantis
Richard Serjeantson

. Whitney, ‘Merchants of light: science as colonization in New Atlantis’, in William A. Sessions (ed.), Francis Bacon’s Legacy of Texts: ‘The Art of Discovery Grows with Discovery’ (New York, AMS, 1990), pp. 255–68; Amy Boesky, ‘Bacon’s New Atlantis and the laboratory of prose’, in Elizabeth Fowler and Roland Greene (eds), The Project of Prose in Early Modern Europe and the New World (Cambridge, Cambridge University Press, 1997), pp. 138–53 (p. 141); and Albanese, ‘New Atlantis’. 72 Francis Bacon, De sapientia veterum (London, 1609). See further Robert Ginsberg, ‘Francis

in Francis Bacon’s New Atlantis