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Histories of England, 1600–1780
Author: Ben Dew

In the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, historians of England pioneered a series of new approaches to the history of economic policy. Commerce, finance and statecraft charts the development of these forms of writing and explores the role they played in the period's economic, political and historiographical thought. Through doing so, the book makes a significant intervention in the study of historiography, and provides an original account of early-modern and Enlightenment history. A broad selection of historical writing is discussed, ranging from the work of Francis Bacon and William Camden in the Jacobean era, through a series of accounts shaped by the English Civil War and the party-political conflicts that followed it, to the eighteenth-century's major account of British history: David Hume's History of England. Particular attention is paid to the historiographical context in which historians worked and the various ways they copied, adapted and contested one another's narratives. Such an approach enables the study to demonstrate that historical writing was the site of a wide-ranging, politically charged debate concerning the relationship that existed – and should have existed – between government and commerce at various moments in England’s past.

Open Access (free)
Patrick Doyle

agriculture to provide the basis of national prosperity. 6 The established foundations of rural communities and the prioritisation of agricultural development allowed the co-operative movement to attain a prominent platform to impact upon the direction of socio-economic policy beyond 1922. The outbreak of the First World War and the subsequent War of Independence that culminated in the establishment of the Irish Free State in 1922, cemented political change in Ireland. The events of these years represented a significant rupture in terms of the demands

in Civilising rural Ireland
Patrick Doyle

accords with Clifford Geertz's view that the aftermath of independence is often a deflating experience. 10 Despite inauspicious beginnings, serious efforts to construct the Irish state did take place. This chapter begins with an outline of the postcolonial moment in Ireland in order to locate the co-operative movement against a backdrop of political, economic and military uncertainties that shaped public policy. Attention turns to examine how the movement played a central role in the creation and implementation of economic policy in the Free State. The chapter focuses

in Civilising rural Ireland
Open Access (free)
Ben Dew

important flashpoints in historical debates, and the subject of extensive commentary. It would, however, be wrong to conclude that writers such as Blair were simply ill-informed. Rather, his comments should be seen as the product of a particular conception of economic issues that was to achieve increasing popularity over the course of the eighteenth century. When discussing commerce and finance, earlier generations of historians were primarily concerned with economic policy and, as such, the specific actions performed by monarchs. This ensured that they treated trade and

in Commerce, finance and statecraft
Open Access (free)
The new Europe takes shape
Kjell M. Torbiörn

the first time in peacetime compelled to import grain from the West to cover its needs. This tangibly illustrated the limits of Soviet economic policy. (Russia had been major wheat exporter to Europe throughout the nineteenth century and early twentieth century until the Bolshevik revolution.) This effectively marked the end to Soviet efforts pursued until the 1950s to achieve economic autarchy. It also became more difficult for the Soviet Union to forbid its satellite countries in Central and Eastern Europe to make contacts with the West, when it itself did so. The

in Destination Europe
Christine E. Hallett

abdication of the Tsar and several months after the Bolsheviks had seized power’.49 She conveys a sense that, even as her personal life is taking a new and satisfying course, the life of her nation is gradually being strangled by the Bolshevik Revolution, the decline into civil war, and the New Economic Policy.50 At the end of the 1920s, Stalin’s ‘revolution from above’, incorporating the collectivisation of agriculture, the industrial drive of the first Five Year Plan, and the ‘Cultural Revolution’ 223 Volunteer girls directed against the old intelligentsia, swept away

in Nurse Writers of the Great War
Open Access (free)
Why might history matter for development policy?
Ravi Kanbur

these issues at the research frontier, but they are often ignored in the policy context. Paradoxically, therefore, where it matters most they tend to ignore politics in the policy prescription, although these days economics research papers are replete with models of rational choice politics. There are two other features of the models and the world view, which underpin economic policy analysis, that are worth highlighting. ‘Initial conditions’ of natural resources, technology, etc. are taken as given for the policy analysis. And the behavioural responses of the

in History, historians and development policy
Sabine Clarke

plans were under way to allow the role of Governor to be an elected seat. 28 Political reform and radical economic policies to improve the lives of Puerto Ricans were essential if the US was to refute claims that in reality it was just another colonial power with no moral authority to pressurise Britain, for example, to commit to greater progress towards giving its colonial subjects the right to self-determination. In response to the information on PRIDCO circulated in 1944 there were discussions at the Colonial Office on the question of

in Science at the end of empire
Open Access (free)
Natural resources and development – which histories matter?
Mick Moore

Development Snyder, Richard (2006). ‘Does lootable wealth breed disorder? A political economy framework’, Comparative Political Studies 39(8): 943–68 Stijns, Jean-Phillipe (2006). ‘Natural resource abundance and human capital accumulation’, World Development 34(6): 1060–83 Torvik, Ragnar (2009). ‘Why do some resource-abundant countries succeed while others do not?’, Oxford Review of Economic Policy 25(2): 241–56 Toye, John (1995). ‘The new institutional economics and its implications for development theory’, in John Harriss, Janet Hunger and Colin M. Lewis (eds), The New

in History, historians and development policy
Open Access (free)
Science and industrial development: lessons from Britain’s imperial past
Sabine Clarke

methods and rhetoric employed by the DSIR were of most importance. The CPRC, the DSIR and also the Development Commission and Empire Marketing Board offered something significant to politicians and officials concerned with economic policy, apart from the promise of useful facts. The creation of these agencies was facilitated by their political utility as these bodies provided a method of stimulating economic growth and development that was could be promoted as useful and effective, a demonstration of the willingness of government to take action, without being overly

in Science at the end of empire