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Yale’s Chronicles of America
Roberta E. Pearson

, the museums and so forth). Simultaneously, a flood of immigrants from Asia and the global south sought refuge in the world’s remaining super-power. Social and cultural elites (educators, state officials, public institutions and the like) reacted to identity politics and immigration with approbation or alarm: some urged a full embrace of multiculturalism while others worried about the fragmentation ensuing

in Memory and popular film
The Pony Express at the Diamond Jubilee
Heidi Kenaga

, which premiered at California’s Diamond Jubilee in 1925. Initiatives by social and civic elites during the early 1920s to regulate the dominant form of entertainment in American life reveal the extent to which movies had become a site of struggle over who could legitimately circulate types of knowledge (for example, historical knowledge) that were invested with cultural power. Postwar xenophobia, on the

in Memory and popular film
Open Access (free)
Mia-Marie Hammarlin

patterns for the preservation of the degree of novelty’ (Asplund 1967:105). At the same time, unmasking oneself publicly and expressing hatred against individuals – any individual – is easier today than it used to be because of technological developments. It is no longer necessary to be a member of the elite in order to have one’s reputation publicly besmirched. One no longer has to have a special position in society in order to keep a well-polished personal apologia at hand, because anybody, no matter who they are, may come to need one. As a consequence of this, a

in Exposed
Continuity and change
Erin Bell and Ann Gray

Queen and at one point is heard apologising to her for ‘stalking’ her over the past eighteen months of filming, certainly emphasising his legitimacy and proximity to the elite subjects of the series he has fronted. However, he also adds what might be interpreted as a reminder of the thorny issue of the Queen’s potential abdication, mirroring that first raised in episode one: ‘For her children and grandchildren, it’s a

in The British monarchy on screen
Paul Henley

forms that testify to class differences: working people hunt rabbits with the aid of ferrets while the elite engage in the traditional mounted foxhunt, or in pheasant shooting, with working people providing ancillary support in both cases as ‘beaters’. In the post-hunt feasting, social differences are reinforced in Dorset, with the elite and the working people eating and drinking separately, and with each group saying that they prefer it that way ( figure 12.1 ). In Provence, by contrast, the principal prey is wild boar and it is an altogether more egalitarian affair

in Beyond observation
Open Access (free)
Fixing the past in English war films
Fred Inglis

were in a position to judge the films for truthfulness as picturing a people’s experience of what Angus Calder called ‘The People’s War’. For the first time in cultural history a huge and historic sequence of events was narrated and represented not on behalf of a powerful elite and as redounding to its credit, but on behalf of a whole population, permitting them to judge for themselves whether they

in British cinema of the 1950s
Open Access (free)
Authorship, praxis, observation, ethnography
Paul Henley

This book offers a historical account of a genre of cinema that combines two distinct practices: the craft of non-fiction film-making, and ethnography, a particular approach to carrying out and representing social research. It is an account that straddles a period of approximately 120 years, from the middle of last decade of the nineteenth century, when the moving image camera was a primitive instrument that was troublesome and expensive to use, and which was therefore reserved to professional elites, mostly in the global North, to the middle

in Beyond observation
Screening Victoria
Steven Fielding

’s ceremonial role is an example of what Joseph Nye referred to as ‘soft power’, that is ‘the ability to get what you want through attraction rather than coercion or payment’. 12 In this instance it mobilises popular feeling towards a conservative conception of national history by placing the monarchy at its centre. This is no accidental outcome. As David Cannadine suggests, the elite’s desire to temper the

in The British monarchy on screen
Open Access (free)
Sharing anthropology
Paul Henley

Ivory Coast. This highly productive period culminated with the release in 1961 of another ethnofiction, La Pyramide humaine (The Human Pyramid), this time about the relationships between African and European pupils at an elite high school in Abidjan, and then Rouch's first film in France, Chronicle of a Summer , which he co-directed with the sociologist-philosopher Edgar Morin

in Beyond observation
Open Access (free)
Mia-Marie Hammarlin

against attempting to attain that status (Daun 1996:52, 207). All this – the consistently low level of corruption, the social trust, egalitarianism, and the Law of Jante – is more or less explicitly expressed in Swedish mediated scandals. Through these characteristics, corruption is held at bay, morality and a sense of duty are reestablished, and the elite are taken down from their pedestals. The Swedish National Council for Crime Prevention (Brå), which is administered by the Ministry of Justice, writes in one of its reports: It could be that different revelations and

in Exposed