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Yale’s Chronicles of America
Roberta E. Pearson

, the museums and so forth). Simultaneously, a flood of immigrants from Asia and the global south sought refuge in the world’s remaining super-power. Social and cultural elites (educators, state officials, public institutions and the like) reacted to identity politics and immigration with approbation or alarm: some urged a full embrace of multiculturalism while others worried about the fragmentation ensuing

in Memory and popular film
The Pony Express at the Diamond Jubilee
Heidi Kenaga

, which premiered at California’s Diamond Jubilee in 1925. Initiatives by social and civic elites during the early 1920s to regulate the dominant form of entertainment in American life reveal the extent to which movies had become a site of struggle over who could legitimately circulate types of knowledge (for example, historical knowledge) that were invested with cultural power. Postwar xenophobia, on the

in Memory and popular film
Open Access (free)
Fixing the past in English war films
Fred Inglis

were in a position to judge the films for truthfulness as picturing a people’s experience of what Angus Calder called ‘The People’s War’. For the first time in cultural history a huge and historic sequence of events was narrated and represented not on behalf of a powerful elite and as redounding to its credit, but on behalf of a whole population, permitting them to judge for themselves whether they

in British cinema of the 1950s
Open Access (free)
Ian Scott and Henry Thompson

social elite in New York across the political divide were hardly troubled by that detail; content to rub alongside a kind of celebrity that they understood only too well. Moreover, this select group was drawn from corporate and moneyed interests that were not so very distant from the film’s supposed target. What did this mix tell us about Stone, the movie colony and the country? It unequivocally told us that Wall Street: Money Never Sleeps was first and foremost dramatic entertainment. The film called attention to the egregious behaviour of Wall Street, but it did not

in The cinema of Oliver Stone
Open Access (free)
Ian Scott and Henry Thompson

at http://​variety.com/​1994/​film/​reviews/​natural-​born-​ killers-​2-​1200438238/​ (accessed 7 December 2015). 30 Interview with Bob Daly, Santa Monica, CA, 18 October 2010. 31 Interview with Oliver Stone, Santa Monica, CA, 19 January 2010. 32 Interview with Oliver Stone, Santa Monica, CA, 19 June 2010. 33 Ibid. 34 The Beltway –​an idiom used to reference the political concerns of the elites in the US capital –​takes its name from the road that P o l itics encircles Washington, DC: interstate 495, also known as the Beltway. 35 Luc Herman, ‘Bestowing

in The cinema of Oliver Stone
Continuity and change
Erin Bell and Ann Gray

Queen and at one point is heard apologising to her for ‘stalking’ her over the past eighteen months of filming, certainly emphasising his legitimacy and proximity to the elite subjects of the series he has fronted. However, he also adds what might be interpreted as a reminder of the thorny issue of the Queen’s potential abdication, mirroring that first raised in episode one: ‘For her children and grandchildren, it’s a

in The British monarchy on screen
Screening Victoria
Steven Fielding

’s ceremonial role is an example of what Joseph Nye referred to as ‘soft power’, that is ‘the ability to get what you want through attraction rather than coercion or payment’. 12 In this instance it mobilises popular feeling towards a conservative conception of national history by placing the monarchy at its centre. This is no accidental outcome. As David Cannadine suggests, the elite’s desire to temper the

in The British monarchy on screen
Open Access (free)
Royal weddings and the media promotion of British fashion
Jo Stephenson

, this DVD still falls under the promotional banner. The commentator declares: ‘I defy any woman to say that a man doesn’t look very handsome in a morning coat, especially if it’s cut by Savile Row.’ 66 The Mayfair headquarters of London’s elite tailors, Savile Row is mentioned again here in the description of brother of the bride James Middleton’s suit. The British manufacture of Kate Middleton’s dress

in The British monarchy on screen
Basil Glynn

bring together … critics and elites who might be partial to period pics, and broader commercial aud[ience]s drawn to the sex and shenanigans’, 52 it was similarly identified by Alessandra Stanley of the New York Times as being lowbrow but fun, ‘a captivating romp, Ocean’s Eleven in ruffs and doublets’, 53 In the New Statesman Rachel Cooke guiltily admitted to being a fan, while stating that if

in The British monarchy on screen