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Regina Maria Roche, the Minerva Press, and the bibliographic spread of Irish gothic fiction
Christina Morin

Elmere and Eugene O’Neil as well as through subtle and not-so-subtle references to other texts and literary genres undoubtedly familiar to her readers. Both techniques function together not to condemn popular literature and gothic romances as falling short of ‘an elite or high literature’ as ‘defin[ed] and valorize[ed]’ by critics, 94 but instead to suggest, as in Austen's Northanger Abbey , that any threat to the reading public offered by such works had to do with how they were read. 95 In their sensitivity to and conscious reflections on literature as well as its

in The gothic novel in Ireland, c. 1760–1829
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Location the Irish gothic novel
Christina Morin

supernatural, the presence of highly stereotyped characters and the attempt to deploy and perfect techniques of suspense’. 6 As terms, both ‘Irish Gothic’ and ‘the Gothic novel’ are valuable for the work they represent: the identification and scholarly recuperation of two interrelated bodies of popular fiction often overshadowed in contemporary critical responses and more recent analysis alike by literature considered more reputable and/or elite. We would do well to remember, though, as James Watt and Richard Haslam have both noted

in The gothic novel in Ireland, c. 1760–1829
Father– daughter incest and the economics of exchange
Jenny DiPlacidi

’s phallic symbol represents the true heir to the castle of Otranto. This size motif is repeated throughout the novel, becoming synonymous with the bloated aristocracy and inheritance structure of the wealthy, property-owning, titled elite. The sins of the father to which Walpole directs attention in his first preface govern the plot of his novel that focuses on inheritances as a metaphor for the state, and

in Gothic incest
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Cousins and the changing status of family
Jenny DiPlacidi

bonds, allowing self-assertion while exposing the dangers of kinship. Kuper analyses the preference of the bourgeoisie for ‘marriages within the kinship network’ and points to Goethe’s characters in The Man of Fifty ( 1829 ) who are ‘cousins … expected to marry each other in order to preserve their patrimony’. 51 He argues that sets of elite and upper-class families in the eighteenth century

in Gothic incest