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Gender and a new politics in Achebe
Elleke Boehmer

’s Anthills of the Savannah (1987) remains the culmination point of his achievement as a writer of fiction, as well as being an elaboration of his earlier novelistic interests. The novel is, as Ben Okri has remarked, Achebe’s ‘most complex and his wisest book to date’.2 Dealing in coded terms with Nigeria’s calcified power-elite, and the bankruptcy of its post-independence nepotistic politics, Anthills of the Savannah is in many respects a sequel to the penultimate novel A Man of the People (1966), which explored themes of political corruption and military takeover on the eve

in Stories of women
Open Access (free)
Elleke Boehmer

are no longer to be compared to children imitating their fathers’ drilling exercises (GW 100). Significantly though, despite the potential subversion implicit in their new military work, ‘their devotion’ to the nation’s cause, the time-honoured role of self-dedication, has redeemed them. The cause itself not only remains of the first importance, but also is elite-driven, firmly in the hands of those at the top. As he drives away, Reginald repeats to himself the words his new friend used to describe her activity: ‘we are doing the work you asked us to do’ (GW 100

in Stories of women
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Ben Okri, Chenjerai Hove, Dambudzo Marechera
Elleke Boehmer

: John's Job Stories of women consequence, in Mbembe’s view, economies in the postcolony are often operative only within small, transnationalised, highly predatory enclaves. Moreover, the perpetuation of traditional elite structures has produced an unprecedented level of privatisation, including of the security forces, resulting in the further generalisation throughout the society of armed violence. Arbitrary power in the postcolony thus converts itself into a common reality, structuring all social meanings, in which the obscene and scatological (the Bakhtinian

in Stories of women
International man of stories
Peter Morey

, personal vengeance and religious faith. Family certainly does matter to this author, but family-type units can materialise in unexpected ways and the ties of blood are often as onerous and oppressive as they are nurturing and supportive. At the same time, in each of his novels, Mistry, like those other influential members of the second generation of postcolonial Indian writers in English, Salman Rushdie, Bapsi Sidhwa and Amitav Ghosh, interrogates and often challenges the complacencies and orthodoxies of those secular and religious elites who run the nation and seek to

in Rohinton Mistry
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White male vulnerability as heterosexual fantasy
Susanna Paasonen

characters. In Twilight, the dark hero is literally a vampire  –​a pale immortal teenager  –​whose passion, should it be unleashed, would be the romantic heroine’s undoing. In Fifty Shades, the hero is a white elite businessman described as an ‘elegant, beautiful, Greek god’ (James, 2012b: 183) with ‘unruly dark copper colored hair and intense, bright gray eyes’ (James, 2012a:  7). Thus his darkness  –​central to the romantic hero –​is not lodged in physical features inasmuch as in the heavy shadows of trauma, deep dark secrets and sexual tastes ringing with risk (Harrison

in The power of vulnerability
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Colonial body into postcolonial narrative
Elleke Boehmer

, rather than the outcome of a smooth historical flow from a determinate origin to a predetermined, preferably glorious future. The writers dramatise the intractability of postcolonial self-representation within the political and aesthetic languages of the colonial west. Indeed, from the point of view of Third World artists who are not part of an elite of any description, the nation itself, whether perceived as real or imaginary, may well appear as an irrelevance or a luxury. As Kwame Appiah has pointed out, to such artists one national cell of structural adjustment or

in Stories of women
Colonialism, Jewishness and politics in Bacon’s New Atlantis
Claire Jowitt

others. Marriage is represented as a corrective for the lower orders since ‘wife and children are a kind of discipline of humanity’, but it is not a panacea as ‘the best works, and of greatest merit for the public, have proceeded from the unmarried Price_07_Ch7 148 14/10/02, 9:45 am Colonialism, Jewishness and politics 149 or childless men.’60 The advocation of marriage as social control for the masses, but not necessarily the elite, revealed here can also be seen in the New Atlantis. Joabin is circumcised; in other words, his sexual desires have been curbed by

in Francis Bacon’s New Atlantis
Critical and historical contexts of the Lord Mayor’s Show
Tracey Hill

aspect of the legitimation and dignification of civic rule in this period, and one for which (as we’ll see further below), the City’s livery companies were prepared to expend considerable sums. Malcolm Smuts has written that mayoral Shows ‘articulated the hierarchical structure of the [civic] community’s elite, while at the same time emphasizing the broad distinction between that elite and everyone else’.49 This is not to assume, however, that the intended effects were always successful. The Shows were a complex, hybrid mixture of the ‘popular’ and the elite. They were

in Pageantry and power
Theorising the en-gendered nation
Elleke Boehmer

dominant position in the text; its positive terms (reason, assertiveness, resourcefulness, conviction) are confirmed in his character and action. He is also, unsurprisingly, vigorously masculine: he is the leader of ‘[o]ur young men [who] must ceaselessly prepare themselves for the fight’. Contrasted with Udomo and highlighting his status as the one true national leader, are two centres of rival power, each in some way a negation or aberration of those characteristics and qualities which Udomo incarnates. On the one side are the members of the exiled elite (all male) who

in Stories of women
Open Access (free)
Peter Morey

. As well as a numerically declining population, there is also a sense of narrowing opportunity for young Parsis in India. The attraction of migration to the west – such as that undergone by Rohinton Mistry – has correspondingly increased. Morey_Mistry_01_Chap 1 11 9/6/04, 4:06 pm 12 Rohinton Mistry Nevertheless, at the heart of Parsi group identity are still the same essential elements that have historically given them a feeling of difference from the surrounding cultures: religious uniqueness; ethnic identity; a shared history and a sense of elite status.21

in Rohinton Mistry