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Felix Kanitz and Balkan archaeology
Vladimir V. Mihajlović

). Contrary to the widespread belief that science is placeless, authors working in this field have shown that, like ‘temporality and embodiment’, geography is also a conditio sine qua non for scientific endeavour of any kind, since ‘spaces both enable and constrain discourse’, as Livingstone (2003: 7) nicely puts it. The concept of space in this particular case takes us to the topics of inclusion and/ or exclusion, validity, veracity, partiality, etc. Accordingly, this chapter questions the role of geography in both the nurturing and the hindering of Kanitz’s scientific

in Communities and knowledge production in archaeology
Open Access (free)
Melanie Giles

experienced’. Aura is perceived as a sensory closeness to that which is distant in time (Riegl [1903] 1982 : 24). However, unlike the monuments we live alongside (from which, as Musil puts it, our attention drips like water from an oilskin, cited in Taussig 1999 : 91), the aura of a bog body derives in part from its sudden and rupturing emergence. The peat cutter’s spade collapses time in its incisive ‘cut’, throwing the past up and out into the present. They are the living embodiment of the way in which Olivier ( 2015 ) and Lucas ( 2004 ) encourage us to conceptualise

in Bog bodies
Open Access (free)
Melanie Giles

deliberately ruined weaponry and body parts for public display and deposition (often in or near watery contexts) is a theme found across mid to late Iron Age northern Europe. At a large or small scale, they tell us that human remains were part of the material embodiment of lethal power that was increasingly used in display, performance or deposition: exercising humiliation, celebrating victory, collecting, cleansing and offering up ruined bodies as well as blades. I want to end this brief survey with a study of the terp region of the Netherlands by Annet Nieuwhof ( 2015

in Bog bodies
Duncan Sayer

) concept of creative entanglement. However, contra Ingold, the material form is not itself an agent of this entanglement (Ingold, 2010 : 12). Instead, embodiment is a creation of cohesive behaviours: individuals use this material culture in communication – signalling shared fraternity and reinforcing social structures. As described here, shoes are similar to all apparel, including weapons or jewellery, which are more than badges or props in social performances. They are also a metaphor for other aesthetic and physical qualities which enhance or define aspects of

in Early Anglo-Saxon cemeteries
Interpreting deposition in the bog
Melanie Giles

for the cut plait on display evokes a woman in a very small-scale, intimate act of offering, hoping for the successful delivery of a child following a previous loss. Where numerous strands or whole, elaborate ‘hairdo’ arrangements are found, this might equally be the voluminous, beautifully prepared embodiment of female virility, given, or forcibly taken, when the need arose. 5.6 Human braids from Sterbygård dating to the Iron Age. All rights reserved and permission to use the figure must be obtained from the copyright holder. Clothing Stand

in Bog bodies
Open Access (free)
Melanie Giles

exhumed from his grave, sewn up in calf skin and immersed in a pool – both descriptions interpreted by Blair ( 2009 ) to mean mosses or bogs. It is understandable that the reputation of the moss and the bog as an ‘other-worldly’ place gathered force in the post-medieval period, once enclosure tightened the formal boundaries of the parish and demarcated the improved and cultivated land from the ‘waste’ of the moss. Whinney Moor, for example, in North Yorkshire, was seen as the physical embodiment of the journey the soul had to undertake – a walking purgatory – as

in Bog bodies