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Open Access (free)
Róisín Read

, Politics and the Power of Representation ( Cham : Palgrave Macmillan ), pp. 35 – 59 , doi: 10.1007/978-3-030-44630-7_2 . Thorpe , H. and Chawansky , M. ( 2020 ), ‘ Gender, Embodiment and Reflexivity in Everyday Spaces of Development in Afghanistan ’, Gender, Place

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Brad Evans

ethical positioning that brings into question all forms of violence, most especially the legitimate violence constituted through the force of law. Denying the constituted embodiment of life, lawful violence is dehumanising. This in turn gives rise to claims about the universal rights of humans in international law and its associative laws of war. Violence is the Result of Underdevelopment Domesticated in the shadow of juridical power by the threat of incarceration, critics of the previous position might also point to our shared material gains and sense of

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
The Politics of ‘Proximity’ and Performing Humanitarianism in Eastern DRC
Myfanwy James

, MSF is what its employees do in its name: employees are the organisation, its human embodiment. It is only through the behaviour of fieldworkers that principles gain meaning. Consequently, MSF staff are ‘on duty’ at all times. As several MSF codes of conduct for expatriates explain, ‘all actions and statements made by staff are seen by outsiders as representing MSF. All staff members should act in accordance with the humanitarian principles … during and outside work hours’ ( MSF-OCA, 2006 ). For MSF staff then, there risks being a tension between the personal and

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
The Law and Politics of Responding to Attacks against Aid Workers
Julia Brooks and Rob Grace

security strategy’, ‘using the local community to be our protection’, and ‘rely[ing] so heavily on explaining who we are, and what we stand for, and how we work, and how decisions are made, and that’s the embodiment of humanitarian principles’. Approaches rooted in ‘protection’ tend to be seen as a necessary evil of security management, to be employed in particularly volatile environments when other approaches appear infeasible or ineffective. Furthermore, creating physical barriers between humanitarian actors and their operational environment can even hinder

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Hakim Khaldi

of the PKK, created in 2003. This outsourcing was strategic: it displeased Turkey which was not only supporting the rebels, but saw the PKK as its long-standing enemy. Moreover, it allowed the Syrian government to concentrate its armed forces on other fronts. There were conditions attached to this understanding between the Syrian government and the local embodiment of the PKK (PYD/YPG). The PYD was not to provide any assistance to the Free Syrian Army (FSA) and was

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Impact of structural tensions and thresholds
Eşref Aksu

. Towards double ‘peaks’: superpower rivalry and decolonisation/non-alignment In the immediate aftermath of World War II, the arrangements for a new world order reflected a multipolar power configuration, the embodiment of which can be found in the Security Council. In economic terms, the United States was clearly the dominant source of power. 1 Yet politically, the colonial powers, the Soviet Union

in The United Nations, intra-state peacekeeping and normative change
Douglas Blum

embodiment of some transcendent truth or goodness, increasingly linked to Christian Orthodoxy.17 This is often connected with an image of Russia as essentially a Eurasian ‘great power’. In contrast, an equally important tendency identi32 2504Chap2 7/4/03 12:38 pm Page 33 Contested national identities fies Russia as fully European, and as such set apart from America with regard to culture and security concerns.18 Both narratives, however, share a predominantly geopolitical orientation to world politics. Another common feature is an insistence on maintaining

in Limiting institutions?
Marta Iñiguez de Heredia

reminds us, alternative forms of political organisation are being created. In this sense a further argument could be advanced: if, as Mbembe states, Africa has been portrayed as the ‘embodiment of nothingness’, we might have to rethink Africa as the embodiment of creativity. Survival/DIY activities ‘signal renewal and creativity’ in ways that show ‘Africa […] immeasurably more alive’ (Davidson 1992: 293). Survival is not just a form of accommodation or domination, but also a form of subversion. Although some survival strategies are a direct denial of a claim, such as

in Everyday resistance, peacebuilding and state-making
Marta Iñiguez de Heredia

implication is that resistance becomes something embodied rather than abstract. Whether resistance requires a theory of embodiment is another matter. At a minimum it requires an account of subjecthood and agency. In the everyday framework, subjects of resistance are ‘fleshed’ people with a particular experience of subordination, with difficult or no access to decision-making power at the institutional level and with difficult or no access to sufficient means of living. Although the hybridity literature in liberal peace debates has explored the impact on livelihoods

in Everyday resistance, peacebuilding and state-making
The analytical framework
Eşref Aksu

. The Charter itself, however, is the embodiment or, to be more precise, the institutionalisation, of those ideas. The UN, by virtue of its Charter, is an institution, in that it ‘involves persistent and connected sets of rules that prescribe behaviour, roles, constrain activity, and shape expectations’. 30 The UN, furthermore, is the/an institution of a particular historical structure. The

in The United Nations, intra-state peacekeeping and normative change