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Ian Scott and Henry Thompson

, Lo v e The [original] script actually resembled the third version [Alexander Revisited, 2007] more than the first two. Warners were upset with me. I promised them a sanitised film. I saw a list of their cuts and we went back and forth. There was no way I was going to make all of those cuts. They wanted all the homosexuality out. They hated Bagoas. There was also huge problems with blood.40 181 melodrama relies on the moral embodiment of a situation.43 Stone responded that: Th e ci nem a of Ol iver   S to ne Dr Paul, in pointing to Aristotle’s ‘single action

in The cinema of Oliver Stone
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Ian Scott and Henry Thompson

about it, and yet in the denouement Stone appears to celebrate that same response. Pagniacci the woman is the embodiment of the wayward corporation. This complexity aside, the film’s wistful veneration of a smaller, more personal world of local football leagues spoke of a paradox felt by many sports fans, who celebrated tradition while embracing the world of corporate franchise football entertainment. It was a cultural yearning that gave vent to the belated success of NBC’s Friday Night Lights from the mid-​2000s, about a college football team in Texas. Meanwhile, the

in The cinema of Oliver Stone
Open Access (free)
Ian Scott and Henry Thompson

reflection. The actor’s career trajectory at that moment was as much of a downward spiral as Wall Street’s fortunes. Both embodiments of the American Dream, but both at this moment at least, seemingly headed for self-​destruction.29 Stone’s disagreement with Fox over Sheen’s fee formed only one part of a wider contest of wills between studio and director. Less than two weeks before the resolution of the Sheen crisis, on 9 September, Stone had written a long memo to Young essentially asking him to back off, stop questioning Stone’s every choice and allow him to work in the

in The cinema of Oliver Stone
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Ian Scott and Henry Thompson

’s administration as being on an ideological crusade to rid the region of all of America’s perceived enemies. Stone’s personal reference point for these on-​screen political observations became the destruction of Camelot and the death of John F. Kennedy: the point at which, as he saw it, institutional power first eclipsed the presidential embodiment of the American spirit. While Stone drew directly on that transition as a source of 95 Th e ci nem a of Ol iver   S to ne 96 motivation in films such as Platoon and JFK, several of his other 1980s productions in the wake of

in The cinema of Oliver Stone
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The cinematic afterlife of an early modern political diva
Elisabeth Bronfen and Barbara Straumann

against the politician, the mediality of her material embodiment also comes to be foregrounded. Moreover, these screen re-enactments thematically address the conflict between private person and public persona particular to female sovereignty because the Queen is both stateswoman and potential wife and mother (or virgin in the case of Elizabeth I). This raises the question of how each of the four film

in The British monarchy on screen
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The Admirable Crichton and Look Back in Anger
Stephen Lacey

this kind of cinematic realism that is important to this argument. Opening out the narrative has the effect of diffusing the claustrophobia of the play. Look Back in Anger sits easily within the dominant conventions of the European naturalist tradition, its single playing space (albeit a lower-class bed-sit rather than a bourgeois drawing-room) functioning as an embodiment of the forces of

in British cinema of the 1950s
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Quentin Crisp as Orlando’s Elizabeth I
Glyn Davis

In 1992, Quentin Crisp appeared on cinema screens as Elizabeth I in Sally Potter's Orlando; the following year, he provided the 'Alternative Queen's Message' on Channel 4 television on Christmas Day, going head-to-head with Elizabeth II. This chapter will revisit this cultural moment, examining the significance of Crisp's perfonnances of 'queenliness'. The late 1980s/early 1990s heralded a shift away from the lesbian and gay politics of the 1970s and '80s towards a more confrontational queer activism. Orlando can be seen as an example of early queer cinema, given its play with gender and sexuality, and Potter's casting of Tilda Swinton (a regular collaborator of Derek Jannan). Other queer films of the time also unsettle and complicate particular moments in history, and equally employ a pointedly artificial mise-en-scene (Jannan's Edward II, Julien's Looking for Langston, Kalin's Swoon). How does Crisp's appearance - as an embodiment of the flaming, camp homosexual - complicate the film's politics of sexuality? Does it articulate a political ' clearing of the ground', with an older gay culture (Elizabeth) giving way to a fresh queer one (Orlando)? This chapter will consider the film as a provocative transition between particular forms of cultural production - bound up with changing attitudes towards the monarchy itself.

in The British monarchy on screen
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Amateur film, civic culture and the rehearsal of monarchy
Karen Lury

Dating from as early as 1906, a large number of amateur films commemorate royal visits to Scotland's town halls and schools. They capture- in lise Hayden's terms - the 'minor events' of British royalty where the monarchs' physical presence and symbolic embodiment are balanced on a 'knife's edge' as both their 'ordinariness' and uniqueness must be maintained simultaneously. This tension explains why the choreographing of these events is often (wearily) similar and the films boring. Nonetheless, these amateur films sometimes capture moments of contingency (the look at the camera, the unseemly exuberance of children) that expose the limits of this balancing act and the 'work' that underpins the perfonnance of monarchy. Conversely, in many cities across Scotland these royal encounters have been re-imagined in pageants and gala days also commemorated in amateur films. In these films, children take on royal functions, becoming fleshy 'effigies' of the monarch in ritualistic performances that dramatize the ambiguous origins of royal pageantry, whether the monarchs involved are 'real' or 'fake'.

in The British monarchy on screen
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Memory and popular film
Paul Grainge

. From its first beginnings, the temporal realities of early cinema – what Leo Charney equates with the shock and embodiment of modern space and time – has posed significant questions for the formation of modern memory. 19 In discursive terms, however, the contemporary period remains the key focus of concern. If a particular moment can be identified where the connections between memory and film become more tangible and self

in Memory and popular film
Contemporary ‘British’ cinema and the nation’s monarchs
Andrew Higson

II’s equally assured embodiment of the powerful monarch in Restoration . In other films, that status of national figurehead may still be in the process of being established, as in Elizabeth , where the ascent to absolute power of the eponymous queen is imaginatively reconstructed; or in The King’s Speech , where George VI must overcome his stammer to win the affection of his people. Or the status

in The British monarchy on screen