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Open Access (free)
Róisín Read

, Politics and the Power of Representation ( Cham : Palgrave Macmillan ), pp. 35 – 59 , doi: 10.1007/978-3-030-44630-7_2 . Thorpe , H. and Chawansky , M. ( 2020 ), ‘ Gender, Embodiment and Reflexivity in Everyday Spaces of Development in Afghanistan ’, Gender, Place

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Brad Evans

ethical positioning that brings into question all forms of violence, most especially the legitimate violence constituted through the force of law. Denying the constituted embodiment of life, lawful violence is dehumanising. This in turn gives rise to claims about the universal rights of humans in international law and its associative laws of war. Violence is the Result of Underdevelopment Domesticated in the shadow of juridical power by the threat of incarceration, critics of the previous position might also point to our shared material gains and sense of

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
The Politics of ‘Proximity’ and Performing Humanitarianism in Eastern DRC
Myfanwy James

, MSF is what its employees do in its name: employees are the organisation, its human embodiment. It is only through the behaviour of fieldworkers that principles gain meaning. Consequently, MSF staff are ‘on duty’ at all times. As several MSF codes of conduct for expatriates explain, ‘all actions and statements made by staff are seen by outsiders as representing MSF. All staff members should act in accordance with the humanitarian principles … during and outside work hours’ ( MSF-OCA, 2006 ). For MSF staff then, there risks being a tension between the personal and

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
The Law and Politics of Responding to Attacks against Aid Workers
Julia Brooks and Rob Grace

security strategy’, ‘using the local community to be our protection’, and ‘rely[ing] so heavily on explaining who we are, and what we stand for, and how we work, and how decisions are made, and that’s the embodiment of humanitarian principles’. Approaches rooted in ‘protection’ tend to be seen as a necessary evil of security management, to be employed in particularly volatile environments when other approaches appear infeasible or ineffective. Furthermore, creating physical barriers between humanitarian actors and their operational environment can even hinder

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Hakim Khaldi

of the PKK, created in 2003. This outsourcing was strategic: it displeased Turkey which was not only supporting the rebels, but saw the PKK as its long-standing enemy. Moreover, it allowed the Syrian government to concentrate its armed forces on other fronts. There were conditions attached to this understanding between the Syrian government and the local embodiment of the PKK (PYD/YPG). The PYD was not to provide any assistance to the Free Syrian Army (FSA) and was

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Adrian Hyde-Price

desire of the new democracies of East Central Europe to ‘return to Europe’. This role-set involves both the role perceptions ascribed to the EU by outsiders and role conceptions expressed by the role-holders themselves (see chapter 6 ). In the early 1990s, these role perceptions and conceptions coalesced around a view of the EU as the institutional embodiment of the ‘European ideal’. The EU was seen

in Rethinking European Union Foreign Policy
Fiona Robinson

constituted by and through relations with others. Care ethics is constituted not by rules or principles, but through practices. In contrast to the masculinist moral subject constructed by rationalist ethics – autonomous, self-willing, governed by reason – care ethicists see moral subjects as naturally vulnerable and mutually dependent. Care ethics emphasizes embodiment and human frailty, and

in Recognition and Global Politics
Open Access (free)
Germany, the use of force and the power of strategic culture
Kerry Longhurst

confirmed through a number of bilateral and trilateral initiatives. Moreover, the ongoing desire to avoid singularity and to maintain its status as a reliable ally has prompted Germany to participate more readily in military deployments, since to abstain would jeopardise its place within the alliance and put it out of step with its allies. In this sense, then, the Bundeswehr is regarded as an armed force within an alliance rather than an embodiment of purely national military strength. The explanation for the endurance of these foundational elements of Germany’s strategic

in Germany and the use of force
Marta Iñiguez de Heredia

reminds us, alternative forms of political organisation are being created. In this sense a further argument could be advanced: if, as Mbembe states, Africa has been portrayed as the ‘embodiment of nothingness’, we might have to rethink Africa as the embodiment of creativity. Survival/DIY activities ‘signal renewal and creativity’ in ways that show ‘Africa […] immeasurably more alive’ (Davidson 1992: 293). Survival is not just a form of accommodation or domination, but also a form of subversion. Although some survival strategies are a direct denial of a claim, such as

in Everyday resistance, peacebuilding and state-making
Open Access (free)
Kerry Longhurst

Halbwachs called ‘historical memory’ and which he regarded as part of the collective memory. A strategic culture as the embodiment of past collective experiences, tied to war and the use of force, ‘is stored and interpreted by social institutions’.27 Hence the substance of a strategic culture reaches the actor both through written records as well as through commemorations that serve to reinforce memory. This means that subsequent generations, who had not lived through the initial or formative experiences that gave rise to a strategic culture, are nevertheless subjects of

in Germany and the use of force