Search results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 38 items for :

  • "embodiment" x
  • Manchester Literature Studies x
Clear All
Open Access (free)
Black Women as Surrogates of Liberation in James Baldwin’s If Beale Street Could Talk
Marquita R. Smith

This essay analyzes how James Baldwin’s late novel If Beale Street Could Talk represents Black women’s care work in the face of social death as an example of how Black women act as surrogates for Black liberation giving birth to a new world and possibilities of freedom for Black (male) people. Within the politics of Black nationalism, Black women were affective workers playing a vital role in the (re)creation of heteronormative family structures that formed the basis of Black liberation cohered by a belief in the power of patriarchy to make way for communal freedom. This essay demonstrates how Beale Street’s imagining of freedom centers not on what Black women do to support themselves or each other, but on the needs of the community at large, with embodied sacrifice as a presumed condition of such liberation.

James Baldwin Review
Open Access (free)
British masculinities, pomophobia, and the post-nation
Berthold Schoene

5 The Union and Jack: British masculinities, pomophobia, and the post-nation BERTHOLD SCHOENE Starting with a general theoretical investigation into nationalist imageries of masculine and feminine embodiment, this essay offers a tentative outline of some of the most problematic shifts in the conceptualisation and literary representation of man, self and nation in Britain throughout the twentieth century. The second part of the essay comprises a close reading of John Osborne’s Look Back in Anger (1993 [1956]), which is to illustrate the syndromic inextricability

in Across the margins
Anu Koivunen, Katariina Kyrölä, and Ingrid Ryberg

embodiment, ethics, affect, and ontology (Ahmed and Stacey, 2001; Clough and Halley, 2007; Garber et  al., 2000; Koivunen, 2001; 2010). Furthermore, it coincides with what Robyn Wiegman (2014) has termed the reparative ‘turn’ in queer feminist criticism. However, the history and routes of the concept’s travels are much longer and more complex. Invoked in the 1980s in the fields of moral and political philosophy (Goodin, 1985; 1988; Nussbaum, 1986), the concept subsequently travelled across disciplines:  from sociology and social policy studies (McLaughlin, 2012; Misztal

in The power of vulnerability
Open Access (free)
The male leader’s autobiography and the syntax of postcolonial nationalism
Elleke Boehmer

his walking into a white court of law wearing traditional Xhosa dress for his October 1962 trial: ‘I was literally carrying on my back the history, culture and BOEHMER Makeup 3/22/05 2:55 PM Page 69 John's G5:Users:john:Public:John's Mac: John's Jobs The male leader’s autobiography 69 heritage of my people. That day, I felt myself to be the embodiment of African nationalism, the inheritor of Africa’s difficult but noble past and her uncertain future.’11 As Mandela’s exemplary stress on embodiment and inheritance shows, the object of attention in the

in Stories of women
Open Access (free)
Colonial body into postcolonial narrative
Elleke Boehmer

, available for use, for husbandry, for numbering, branding, cataloguing, possession, penetration. Images of the body of the other are conventionally conflated with those of the land, unexplored land too being seen as amorphous, wild, seductive, dark, open to possession. Differently from the psychoanalytical scenario therefore, agency in this case belongs to the colonial/analyst, not to the colonised/patient (hence the only partial analogy). Examples of such embodiment are fully present in the texts of the European explorers and travellers who prepared the ground for

in Stories of women
Open Access (free)
Don’t Ever Wipe Tears Without Gloves as a reparative fantasy
Anu Koivunen

, symbolically healing past wrongs  –​the blaming and offending of AIDS victims in the 1980s public discourse on the epidemic, the inhumane treatment of patients, and the subsequent long silence. As the embodiment  217 The caring nation 217 Figure 12.1  Swedish Crown Princess Victoria awarded the prize of ‘Homo of the Year’ to Jonas Gardell at the annual QX gay gala, 4 February 2013. of the state of Sweden, the Crown Princess retrospectively offered both recognition and care. In the ‘we’ of the royal speech, the gay community, once regarded as ‘not-​us’, was called upon

in The power of vulnerability
Theorising the en-gendered nation
Elleke Boehmer

’s (alleged and acclaimed) corporeality, mystery and sensuality. In Léopold Senghor’s much-quoted poem ‘Femme nue, femme noire’, for instance, the woman is apostrophised as Beloved and as desirable body. 8 Her physical form is glorified, even fetishised: it is a body triumphantly corporeal, entirely body, and thus, in terms of the values endorsed by the poetry, a true embodiment of Africa. Yet, even if sexualised, her form is also maternal; she is the nurturing presence of the past: ‘J’ai grandi à ton ombre; la douceur de tes mains bandait mes yeux’ (‘In your shadow I have

in Stories of women
Open Access (free)
White male vulnerability as heterosexual fantasy
Susanna Paasonen

young and brown-​haired drug addict mother by her pimp, who hit, kicked and burnt him with cigarettes. The stuff of trauma emerges as a key explanation for both Christian’s BDSM interest and  140 140 Vulnerability and visibility discomfort with physical intimacy in ways that position his kink preference as an outcome of harm, and therefore a problem to be solved. Anastasia, who becomes the only woman allowed to touch the scars on Christian’s muscular, sculpted torso, finds herself thinking of them as a ‘stark physical embodiment of a horrific childhood and a

in The power of vulnerability
Open Access (free)
Peter Morey

have both observed that Mistry deprives his characters of any radical agency in the fraught political situation of the Emergency, instead producing a bleak account at odds with popular opposition to state initiatives both at the time and since. Bhatnagar claims that ‘the text highlights the elements of despair at the cost of presenting an accurate description of the forces of resistance’.25 For her, the character of Avinash provides an embodiment of the resistant spirit abroad at the time, but is too quickly silenced. Nor is any indication given of how the lower

in Rohinton Mistry
The failure and success of a Swedish film diversity initiative
Mara Lee Gerdén

language of vulnerability, thus disclosing a political and creative potential that stresses agency and embodiment. FUSION AS A DIVERSITY INITIATIVE The background of the Fusion Programme was the 2013 reform for film financing in Sweden.2 This reform aimed at reaching actual and literal gender equality: to divide funding evenly between men and women. In comparison, the diversity goal expressed in the same plan was spineless. Diversity was described as a ‘perspective’: ‘funding shall be given based on the perspective of diversity’.3 The same phrasing is found in the bill

in The power of vulnerability