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The wall texts of a Percy family manuscript and the Poulys Daunce of St Paul’s Cathedral
Heather Blatt

secular and one religious, and will argue that the material environs effect alternative modes of reading experience shaped by both architectural space and the embodiment of readers. 130 Participatory reading in late-medieval England The Percy wall texts The secular example with which I begin addresses a series of particularly noteworthy wall texts recorded in the mid-fifteenthcentury English manuscript MS Royal 18.D.ii at the British Library in London. The manuscript is best known as the sole illuminated copy of Lydgate’s Siege of Thebes. The illuminations in the

in Participatory reading in late-medieval England
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The change in mentality
Simha Goldin

heart of Judaism—the Talmud. He Goldin, Apostasy and Jewish identity.indd 120 20/08/2014 12:34:47 Conclusions: The change in mentality 121 deliberately ignored the usual Christian direction of theological debate with the principles of Judaism, and the attempt to achieve a theological victory in polemics, directing his arrows against what he saw as the embodiment of the very soul of the Jewish people. It is that which he wishes to harm—and does. And indeed, at the end of the thirteenth century, when R. Meir ben Baruch of Rothenburg attempted to initiate an ‘Exodus

in Apostasy and Jewish identity in High Middle Ages Northern Europe
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Thomas of Erceldoune’s prophecy, Eleanor Hull’s Commentary on the penitential Psalms, and Thomas Norton’s Ordinal of alchemy
Heather Blatt

intersecting, affect each other – and affect even the user or reader. Although the convergence of multiple temporalities may take place differently according to particular types of media, such convergences are not unique to digital media. For example, consider the widespread and influential metaphor of the book as flesh of Christ, previously mentioned as an example of the intersection between materiality and embodiment in reading practice. The metaphor also possesses a temporal functionality. One of the more descriptive uses of the metaphor is provided by Richard Rolle in a

in Participatory reading in late-medieval England
The lump-child and its parents in The King of Tars
Jane Gilbert

the Tartar king’s request to the Pope for religious teachers and the consequent mission of two friars, rather than the military crusade to liberate the Holy Land favoured by most other versions.9 In the chronicle analogues, the child’s physical imperfection is the symbol and embodiment of its father’s spiritual irregularity, the fleshly revelation of his inferior religious status. Before their christening, father and son are deemed sub-human to the degree that each represents only the crude form of a human being, lacking that spiritual dimension which properly

in Pulp fictions of medieval England
Suzanne Conklin Akbari

knight Otuel couches his conversion in terms which even more vigorously conflate the divine and the feudal: when a white dove, embodiment of the Holy Spirit, alights upon him, Otuel declares, ‘Mahoun and Iouyn, y wyl for-sake, / and to Jhesu crist y wyl me take, / to bene hys knyght.’30 Ferumbras declares that he is henceforth Oliver’s ‘man’, while Otuel pledges that he is Jesus’ ‘knyght’; in each case, however, the assumption of Christian identity is simultaneous with the acquisition of a place within the feudal system in which man owes loyalty to man. Not so in the

in Pulp fictions of medieval England
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Reading practices and participation in digital and medieval media
Heather Blatt

engage the material body of the reader, I show how participatory reading practices evidence a late-medieval awareness of the significance of bodily experience to the work of reading. In other words, studying the participatory work of reading involves assessing how reading was understood as a bodily, embodied activity. Embodiment becomes manifest in reading practice through the mobility of readers in architectural space, through the practice of immersion that led readers to situate themselves as if physically embodied in narratives, and to other reading experiences that

in Participatory reading in late-medieval England
Simha Goldin

himself prays against the Christians in order to help the Jews who were being forced by them to become baptized.26 The Jewish sources go on to reject the Christian notion that all biblical references to purification by water are an allusion to baptism, as interpreted by Jesus. First, they are careful to reject this idea on a theological basis, pointing out that it does not even make any sense. Second, they use a contemptuous tone towards this explicitly Christian symbol, transforming it from an embodiment of grace, pity, and new life to a representation of larceny

in Apostasy and Jewish identity in High Middle Ages Northern Europe
Open Access (free)
Daniel C. Remein and Erica Weaver

Grendel lurking ‘in þystrum’ (in darkness) (87b), able to hear the music but perpetually unable to secure an invitation to the party. The ‘radical reconfiguration of the interconnection of time, space, and embodiment’ that, according to Gillian R. Overing, Beowulf offers its readers may render the poem particularly recalcitrant to any conclusive familiarity – much less intimacy, for ‘the beginning student of the poem … encounters the same difficulty as the lifelong scholar’. 14

in Dating Beowulf
Ad Putter

_McDonald_09_Ch8 177 11/18/03, 17:05 178 Ad Putter this light the realignment of story-order and text-order, and the redistribution of narrative functions to just a handful of main characters like Gawain and the Red Knight, who, simply by dint of reappearing and being related to other characters,16 become, as it were, the very embodiments of narrative continuity. There are also other, apparently bizarre, changes in detail that work purposefully to the same end. The naming of Percyvell after his father, unique to this story, is an example of such a change, as is the father

in Pulp fictions of medieval England
Christopher Abram

, locals saw him as an embodiment of the marshland, and credited him with controlling the height of seasonal floods – he did nobody harm until the Dutch arrived to begin delving and pumping. As the waters receded from the bogs, Tiddy Mun lost his habitat, for he had lived down in the still green water, coming out on to dry land only in the evenings, when the mist rose: For thee know'st, Tiddy Mun dwelt in tha watter-holes doun deep i’ tha green still watter, an’ a comed out nobbut of evens, whan tha

in Dating Beowulf