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Writing on the body
Dana Mills

registers of the term sic and its use throughout the book, while releasing/​turning towards other dance and political theorists who have considered the relationship between dance and writing. Two books in particular have discussed inscription within the discipline of political theory and embodiment theory. Carrie Noland’s Agency and Embodiment:  Performing Gestures/​Producing Culture discusses the communicative power of gesture and reinstates embodied discourses in a performative setting. She argues that gesture is a phenomenologically independent world constructed

in Dance and politics
One Billion Rising, dance and gendered violence
Dana Mills

reception of the movement’s message, a moment of sic-​ sensuous. The chapter starts from a movement that tries to explicitly intervene in public spaces and positions women’s bodies in protest against the degradation of women and girls around the world. The chapter ends in the individual resisting body that may not take on board One Billion Rising’s message tout court. Nevertheless, the fractured body will respond to the call to oppose the marginalisation of female embodiment in its own way. Thus the chapter examines the reoccupation of space through dance on a dual level

in Dance and politics
Open Access (free)
Mads Qvortrup

, or to write histories of ideas tracing the morphology of a given concept over time’ (Skinner 1969: 48). For, as he goes on, ‘the classic texts are concerned with their own alien problems’ (52). Any ‘statement is inescapably the embodiment of particular intentions, or a particular occassion’, and thus specific to its context in a way that it can only be ‘naïve to try to transcend’ (50). Skinner has a point. Rousseau was obviously a product of his age. As is natural, even for a genius, he reacted to developments in his own age. Yet this does not mean that we cannot

in The political philosophy of Jean-Jacques Rousseau
Isadora Duncan’s danced revolution
Dana Mills

as legitimate and she is interpreted as a legible subject. Consequently she unravelled numerous spheres of resistance to those who followed her. Duncan’s interpretation of her own embodiment in bringing her body to performance anticipates what will later be interpreted as radical feminism, understanding women’s oppression and marginalisation as occurring in further and more clandestine ways than mere legal structures.2 Let Isadora Duncan enter centre stage of the argument; I invite the reader–​spectator to take their seat in a performance taking place on 7 October

in Dance and politics
Impact of structural tensions and thresholds
Eşref Aksu

. Towards double ‘peaks’: superpower rivalry and decolonisation/non-alignment In the immediate aftermath of World War II, the arrangements for a new world order reflected a multipolar power configuration, the embodiment of which can be found in the Security Council. In economic terms, the United States was clearly the dominant source of power. 1 Yet politically, the colonial powers, the Soviet Union

in The United Nations, intra-state peacekeeping and normative change
Open Access (free)
Seas, oceans and civilisations
Jeremy C.A. Smith

, the English were well placed to exploit long-​distance trade as a specialism. In the early decades, officials of the English East India Company adopted the strategy of negotiating commercial privileges rather than using force as the first resort in the manner of the Portuguese. In many ways they carried the authority of the empire in their person. As ‘agents of empire’ they personified an implicit imperium. Thomas Raffles exemplified the embodiment 120 120 Debating civilisations of personal and imperial authority in his deal-​making strategy in Singapore

in Debating civilisations
Open Access (free)
Kevin Harrison and Tony Boyd

, revolutionary action, authoritarianism and aggressive violent purposes. Much of this was derived from the military experience of many fascists during the First World War, though there were important sources in cultural and artistic movements of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Another inspiration was the spiritual qualities of the countryside, nature and peasant life – the embodiment of ‘true

in Understanding political ideas and movements
Adrian Hyde-Price

desire of the new democracies of East Central Europe to ‘return to Europe’. This role-set involves both the role perceptions ascribed to the EU by outsiders and role conceptions expressed by the role-holders themselves (see chapter 6 ). In the early 1990s, these role perceptions and conceptions coalesced around a view of the EU as the institutional embodiment of the ‘European ideal’. The EU was seen

in Rethinking European Union Foreign Policy
Fiona Robinson

constituted by and through relations with others. Care ethics is constituted not by rules or principles, but through practices. In contrast to the masculinist moral subject constructed by rationalist ethics – autonomous, self-willing, governed by reason – care ethicists see moral subjects as naturally vulnerable and mutually dependent. Care ethics emphasizes embodiment and human frailty, and

in Recognition and Global Politics
Jeremy C.A. Smith

). Western modernity seemed to the Japanese to be the embodiment of ‘civilisation’ as a mode of being juxtaposed to the moral value attributed to the religious heritage of Asian civilisations (Gluck, 2011). In the early years, ‘being civilised’ meant superficially following Western etiquette, fashions and speech. Many Japanese came to believe that the deeper attributes of Western modernities could be carefully modified. Encounters with the conceptual apparatus of Western thought encouraged this understanding. As with other concepts that entered East Asia in wider

in Debating civilisations