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Antonín Salač and the French School at Athens
Thea De Armond

). It is not surprising that the history of Classical archaeology maps onto geopolitics. After all, with their shared claims to universality, Classics and empire have much in common (Porter, 2006; Bradley, 2010); Classical materials – like so many other desirable goods – gravitate toward power. Of course, Classics has never been the sole provenance of the powerful. Even the geopolitically ‘marginal’ have sought their share of Classical culture (see Stephens and Vasunia, 2010), to say nothing of so-called ‘source’ nations such as Greece and Italy (see Hamilakis, 2007

in Communities and knowledge production in archaeology
Felix Kanitz and Balkan archaeology
Vladimir V. Mihajlović

; Horel, 2011: 16–17; Teichner, 2015: 7). At the age of 14 he started training as an illustrator at the studio of the famous illustrator Vincenz Grimm (1800–72) in Pest. Grimm was a very important figure in Hungarian artistic circles of the time – he was the founder of the ROBERTS 9781526134554 PRINT.indd 189 03/12/2019 08:56 190 Communities and knowledge production in archaeology Pest Art Society (Pesti műegylet) – and, likewise, close friend to numerous politicians and scholars in the Habsburg Empire (Horel, 2011: 17; Timotijević, 2011: 94). As a result, while

in Communities and knowledge production in archaeology
Open Access (free)
Jes Wienberg

environment, values, and institutions (e.g. Kennedy 1987 ; Tainter 1988 ; Diamond 2005 ; Acemoglu & Robinson 2012 ). How and why could once powerful civilisations collapse? Examples that have exerted fascination include Ancient Rome, the Maya in Central America, Angkor in Cambodia, the Norse settlements on Greenland, Easter Island, the British Empire, and the USSR. In our own time, there is a discussion about whether the US is entering a phase of decline and fall. Will China be the new superpower instead? Ruins and wrecks are material icons of decline and decay. The

in Heritopia
Open Access (free)
Jes Wienberg

to legitimise a political or military agenda – in the colonisation of Africa, in the reuse of the Roman Empire by Italian fascism, in the conduct of Nazi Germany in Eastern Europe, in Saddam Hussein’s Iraq, and in the construction of a common Europe; how heritage has deliberately been destroyed to weaken identities in war zones in the Balkans, Afghanistan, Mali, and Syria; how treasures have been moved from the periphery of the colonies to central museums in the West; and how the past is used commercially and is being worn down by mass tourism. The list could be

in Heritopia
Open Access (free)
Clusters of knowledge
Julia Roberts and Kathleen Sheppard

. Mihajlović’s discussion of Kanitz and his impact on Serbian archaeology focuses on the latter’s role as the central node of a complicated archaeological network. Despite having little, if any, formal training, Kanitz has been called the ‘Columbus of the Balkans’ and his archaeological work continues to exert considerable authority over modern studies of Roman Serbia. Mihajlović argues that, having been subjected to the frontier colonialism of the Austro-Hungarian Empire, Kanitz deliberately set out to create a network of people from various political, academic, ethnic and

in Communities and knowledge production in archaeology
Open Access (free)
Melanie Giles

small-scale societies. As such, the division between apparently ‘pragmatic’ and more ‘ritualised’ explanations of bog body violence will become blurred. Instead, the notion of the generative affect of violent performance will be critically discussed within the notion of both a ‘sacrificial’ and a ‘destructive’ economy (after Fontijn 2020 ). It will also critically consider how these practices might have been shaped and transformed anew by the Roman Empire, in those countries facing conquest and occupation, as well as those on the edge of this colonial ‘ripple effect

in Bog bodies
Open Access (free)
Jes Wienberg

examples of preservation can also be documented in the Roman Empire. For instance, attempts were made in the fourth and fifth centuries to regulate the use of monuments as quarries for spolia ; this serves as evidence that extensive destruction occurred. The Ostrogoth king Theodoric regretted the destruction in Rome, but he himself imported spolia for his construction projects in Ravenna in around the year 500 (Schnapp 1993 (French): 83f; 1996 (English): 83; Fabricius Hansen 2003 : 108ff, 157, 238f). In 1162, the Roman Senate laid down the death penalty and loss

in Heritopia
Open Access (free)
The first Dutch excavation in Italy, 1952–58
Arthur Weststeijn and Laurien de Gelder

-Italian ROBERTS 9781526134554 PRINT.indd 69 03/12/2019 08:56 70 Communities and knowledge production in archaeology archaeologists remained in force for decades and was further intensified during the Fascist regime, when archaeology became one of the main vehicles of Mussolini’s pretended rebirth of the Roman Empire (Bourdin and Nicoud, 2013; cf. Palombi, 2006). With the fall of the regime in 1943 and the subsequent liberation of Italy in 1945, this attitude started to change. In the years following the war, many members of the Italian intellectual and academic community

in Communities and knowledge production in archaeology
Open Access (free)
Displaying the dead
Melanie Giles

Room 50, which spans the later prehistory of Britain. Lindow Man is now appropriately positioned at the threshold of transition into the Roman gallery, offering a last glance at the people conquered by Rome, before we are immersed in the weaponry, religious icons, dining sets and mosaics of that extraordinary empire. He is juxtaposed (across the throughfare) with another peri-Conquest body: the cremated remains from the Welwyn burial. Both men saw the coming of Rome’s government and army, one in the south (an elite figure, benefitting from trade and sociopolitical

in Bog bodies
Interpreting deposition in the bog
Melanie Giles

impressive serving and body-ornament pieces that evoke a new era of diacritical display and hospitality, drawn in part from the very empire that haunted its borders. In Ireland, the Ballyedmond cauldron has a lower sheet-bronze base topped by riveted plates to create a capacious vessel, capable of being heated: it is old and patched with over thirty repairs of decorative, punched and incised plaques, inside and out (Raftery 1994 , fig. 64b; Joy 2014b : 347). Cauldrons from Urlingford, the bog of Allen and Ballymoney are also heavily repaired (Joy 2014b : 356 and 349

in Bog bodies