Joe Turner

2 Making love, making empire On 19 April 1899 a troupe of South African ‘tribal’ groups landed at Southampton docks on the South Coast of England. Later that month they were due to perform a central role in the Earl’s Court exhibition Savage South Africa. Local reports claimed that ‘among the effects were over 200 natives of South African tribes, a number of Boer families, representatives of the mounted police, and a number of animals’ (Shephard 1986: 97). Early film footage, archived by the Colonial Film Project, shows the apparent moment when the groups

in Bordering intimacy
Laura Chrisman

chapter3 21/12/04 11:14 am Page 51 3 Empire’s culture in Fredric Jameson, Edward Said and Gayatri Spivak Aijaz Ahmad’s landmark 1992 book In Theory argues that materialist and postcolonial cultural studies are fundamentally incompatible projects.1 Whatever Ahmad may aver, relations between materialism and postcolonialism are more complex than mere incompatibility. For instance, Said’s essay on empire in Jane Austen’s Mansfield Park appears in a recent book titled Contemporary Marxist Literary Criticism, where the editor Francis Mulhern defines Said as

in Postcolonial contraventions
Open Access (free)
Postcolonial governance and the policing of family
Author: Joe Turner

Bordering intimacy is a study of how borders and dominant forms of intimacy, such as family, are central to the governance of postcolonial states such as Britain. The book explores the connected history between contemporary border regimes and the policing of family with the role of borders under European and British empires. Building upon postcolonial, decolonial and black feminist theory, the investigation centres on how colonial bordering is remade in contemporary Britain through appeals to protect, sustain and make family life. Not only was family central to the making of colonial racism but claims to family continue to remake, shore up but also hide the organisation of racialised violence in liberal states. Drawing on historical investigations, the book investigates the continuity of colonial rule in numerous areas of contemporary government – family visa regimes, the policing of sham marriages, counterterror strategies, deprivation of citizenship, policing tactics, integration policy. In doing this, the book re-theorises how we think of the connection between liberal government, race, family, borders and empire. In using Britain as a case, this opens up further insights into the international/global circulations of liberal empire and its relationship to violence.

Benoît Pouget

Based on a study of intersecting French archives (those of the Val de Grâce Hospital, the Service Historique de la Défense and the Archives Diplomatiques), and with the support of numerous printed sources, this article focuses on the handling of the bodies of French soldiers who died of cholera during the Crimean War (1854–56). As a continuation of studies done by historians Luc Capdevila and Danièle Voldman, the aim here is to consider how the diseased corpses of these soldiers reveal both the causes and circumstances of their deaths. Beyond the epidemiological context, these dead bodies shed light on the sanitary conditions and suffering resulting from years of military campaigns. To conclude, the article analyses the material traces left by these dead and the way that the Second Empire used them politically, giving the remains of leaders who died on the front lines of the cholera epidemic a triumphant return to the country and a state funeral.

Human Remains and Violence: An Interdisciplinary Journal
Open Access (free)
Seas, oceans and civilisations
Jeremy C.A. Smith

these respective fields of scholarship. To begin with, I propose that connections across seas span a range of remarkable diversity, just as links across lands do. A typology of those connections can discern features of oceanic, portal or thalassic, and islander-​based civilisations in their orientation (Mazlish, 2004: 21–​41; Murphy, 2001; Paine, 2013) –​an orientation that is as decidedly civilisational in character as any of the land-​based empires. Yet, the orientations of oceanic, portal and islander civilisations have not received the attention that they should

in Debating civilisations
Alexis Heraclides and Ada Dialla

those of European extraction, and treaties with states outside Europe (and America) were unequal, with the sovereignty and independence of the Ottoman Empire, China, Siam, Persia and Japan thereby limited. 13 Civilization linked with progress ‘became a scale by which the countries of the world were categorized into “civilized”, barbarous and savage spheres’, 14 a distinction adhered to by Montesquieu in The Spirit of the Laws , 15 which was common among

in Humanitarian intervention in the long nineteenth century
Open Access (free)
Joe Turner

) The above event, and the narrative of Charlotte Bronte’s Jane Eyre more broadly, provides a compelling theorisation of familial domesticity and the regulation of mobility under the British Empire. Bertha Mason, the subject of the above passage, is presented as the first ‘creole’ wife of Mr Rochester, one of the central protagonists in the novel. Her incarceration 30 Bordering intimacy in the attic of Rochester’s house remains a powerful example of the nature of racialisation and control in Victorian England. This chapter uses the figure of Bertha and her

in Bordering intimacy
Open Access (free)
Bordering intimacy
Joe Turner

, barriers to citizenship and infrastructural blockages, and are performed in the everyday racism and structural violence that the airline crew member was subjected to and was forced (through economic survival and labour market pressure) to enact. Bordering can be performed and policed by legal categories of the state, by international organisations and private companies, just as it is enacted in spit from the mouth of the racist. In revealing a series of circulations that tie together questions of intimacy, family, race, empire, borders, this event opens up a series of

in Bordering intimacy
Open Access (free)
Pasts and presents
Joe Turner

Conclusion: pasts and presents This book began as an investigation into the relationship between family and borders; however, it became increasingly apparent that this makes no sense outside of the history and legacy of empire. Government and the organisation of violence continue to be shaped by imperial and colonial histories and the ongoing remaking of liberal empire within and beyond postcolonial states like Britain. In this context, borders and bordering are better understood as modes of colonial rule brought ‘home’ to metropoles, energised and legitimated

in Bordering intimacy
Open Access (free)
Joe Turner

5 Deprivation In the last chapter I showed how ideas of the imperilled white family have animated the scandal of grooming and play a part in how this act is rendered exceptional, and how this conditions the exceptional act of the state depriving subjects of citizenship. Now I want to delve into more detail regarding the tactic of deprivation itself. This means teasing out how deprivation works in relation to race, sexuality and empire. In this chapter I want to explore in more detail how ‘citizens’ are made into ‘migrants’ who can then be detained, deported and

in Bordering intimacy