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Open Access (free)
Ian Scott and Henry Thompson

Conclusion Although we are clearly overreaching, it’s too easy to talk about the USA losing its grip because we happen to be rooting for another approach. It’s not going to go away that easily. This empire is Star Wars in the ‘evil empire’ sense of the words … We are virtually becoming a tyranny against the rest of the world. It’s not evident to people at home, because they don’t see the consensus in the media and they don’t see the harm the USA does abroad. We are not in decline. We are decayed and corrupt and immoral, but not in decline. The USA exerts its

in The cinema of Oliver Stone
Open Access (free)
Ian Scott and Henry Thompson

post-​9/​ 11 change was proving terribly difficult to do. By the time that the Untold History project began to form as an idea in late 2007, the 201 Th e ci nem a of Ol iver   S to ne 202 fact that the media had so little to say about the condition of the USA galvanised Stone to press on with a series underwritten by the idea that the pursuit of empire was an economic project for the USA as much as it was a political one, and that American corporate interests were invariably the (major) beneficiaries of whatever intervention the government had initiated in the

in The cinema of Oliver Stone
Open Access (free)
Ian Scott and Henry Thompson

been excised or downplayed in a host of studies of the twentieth century. The themes of empire and perpetual war were important reference points in this reassessment. Therefore, as a project, Untold History was nothing less than a repudiation of Luce’s prophecy and the corresponding call to arms and psychological hold that his ‘American Century’ concept had had on the nation’s psyche for more than seventy years. Despite the vehemence of this repudiation, Stone’s public declarations and cinematic position on war and empire have never simply aspired to isolationism. He

in The cinema of Oliver Stone
Open Access (free)
Ian Scott and Henry Thompson

viewpoint: it is what comes naturally to them. It’s not done out of malice, they don’t know any better –​they find it hard to become more international. A British journalist, perhaps because he comes from a smaller country, goes out and sees the world. I don’t believe the American journalist does that –​certainly the ones that belong to the mainstream. Even the New York Times, which is supposed to be the most liberal, is pro-​empire. American interests come first. In the handling of stories like Iran and even Cuba, you never get the full historical background. We never go

in The cinema of Oliver Stone
Open Access (free)
Ian Scott and Henry Thompson

everything passes, even the empire of the USA. As to whether a deal might be made with the USA, Castro talks about the difficulty of trusting the USA to keep its word. He concludes that: ‘The only thing the US accepts is that you sell out.’ Looking for Fidel certainly produced a more rounded appraisal of Castro, although one that happened by accident or insistence –​HBO’s somewhat confused position on the subject –​rather than design. Castro finally stood down as president on 24 February 2008, confirming that he was in poor health; however, following some rehabilitation

in The cinema of Oliver Stone
Open Access (free)
Ian Scott and Henry Thompson

to these stories and putting the record straight.48 Amid a polarised media discourse, the parable of military overreach and the limits of empire offered by Alexander gave the film a measure of contemporary perspective, ensuring that it remained aloof from the ‘patriotic war experience’ category of movies described by Carl Boggs and Tom Pollard, which might have produced a different commercial result for the picture.49 By July 2005, during preparations for the recut DVD release of Alexander, Stone acknowledged publically some of the difficulties in the New

in The cinema of Oliver Stone
Open Access (free)
Ian Scott and Henry Thompson

of director is not just a job. Paul Graff and Christina Graff, Stone’s special effects team for Wall Street: Money Never Sleeps and Savages, and award-​winners themselves for their work on TV series such as Boardwalk Empire (HBO, 2010–​14), see Stone’s modus operandi while on set as keeping people slightly on edge, as Paul Graff observes: Nevertheless, there have been some adjustments personally and professionally. Borman notes that Stone appears calmer and more reflective than in earlier years. Tod Maitland, who worked as Stone’s sound mixer on Talk Radio, Born

in The cinema of Oliver Stone
Queen Victoria, photography and film at the fin de siècle
Ian Christie

being shown throughout Britain and the British Empire, as well as elsewhere, has hardly been assessed. Nor has the relationship between Victoria’s long-standing interest in photography, still very much in evidence at the time of the Jubilee, and her response to ‘animated photography’. While John Plunkett has argued convincingly for seeing Victoria as ‘media made’, his focus is primarily on ‘the tremendous

in The British monarchy on screen
Robert Murphy

question the dominant stylistic approaches or provide stimulus for social change, with the result that there has been virtually no avant-garde film-making and no effective militant cinema in Britain’. 2 Durgnat is much less time-bound and his analysis of British cinema has proved remarkably prescient. A Mirror for England deals with topics such as national identity and the decline of empire, realism and

in British cinema of the 1950s
Editor: Mandy Merck

Moving images of the British monarchy, in fact and fiction, are almost as old as the moving image itself, dating back to an 1895 dramatic vignette, The Execution of Mary Queen of Scots. Led by Queen Victoria, British monarchs themselves appeared in the new 'animated photography' from 1896. Half a century later, the 1953 coronation of Elizabeth II was a milestone in the adoption of television, watched by 20 million Britons and 100 million North Americans. At the century's end, Princess Diana's funeral was viewed by 2.5 billion worldwide. Seventeen essays by international commentators examine the portrayal of royalty in the 'actuality' picture, the early extended feature, amateur cinema, the movie melodrama, the Commonwealth documentary, New Queer Cinema, TV current affairs, the big screen ceremonial and the post-historical boxed set. These contributors include Ian Christie, Elisabeth Bronfen, Andrew Higson, Steven Fielding, Karen Lury, Glyn Davis, Ann Gray, Jane Landman, Victoria Duckett, Jude Cowan Montague, James Downs, Barbara Straumann, Deirdre Gilfedder, Jo Stephenson, Ruth Adams, Erin Bell, Basil Glynn and Nicola Rehling.