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A Review of Hilton Als’ God Made My Face: A Collective Portrait of James Baldwin
Leah Mirakhor

This essay reviews Hilton Als’ 2019 exhibition God Made My Face: A Collective Portrait of James Baldwin at the David Zwirner Gallery. The show visually displays Baldwin in two parts: “A Walker in the City” examines his biography and “Colonialism” examines “what Baldwin himself was unable to do” by displaying the work of contemporary artists and filmmakers whose works resonate with Baldwin’s critiques of masculinity, race, and American empire. Mirakhor explores how Als’ quest to restore Baldwin is part of a long and deep literary and personal conversation that Als has been having since he was in his teens, and in this instance, exploring why and how it has culminated via the visual, instead of the literary. As Mirakhor observes, to be in the exhibit is not to just observe how Als has formed and figured Baldwin, but to see how Baldwin has informed and made Als, one of our most lyrical and impassioned contemporary writers and thinkers.

James Baldwin Review
Crossing the (English) language barrier
Willy Maley

, there are very good historical reasons for Scotland and Ireland being averse to one another, to do with Empire and Union, and I have written elsewhere on that aversion (Maley 2000a; 2000b). Here, I want to accentuate the positive. In this essay I shall explore the missing middle of the vernacular in Irish writing, drawing on Edna Longley’s perceptive remarks about Tom Paulin’s poetic project and the vexed issue of UlsterScots. I propose to take in other kinds of writing than just poetry, though the chief part of what I have to say does relate to verses. A few years

in Across the margins
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British masculinities, pomophobia, and the post-nation
Berthold Schoene

postmodern? (1996: 24–5) But pomophobia does not always of necessity manifest itself in crass, catastrophically violent, fascistic reassertions of the ancient self/other binary. Its presence may be latent in a culture as, I find, it is in Britain, particularly in English culture but perhaps also, so I would like to argue, in Scottish culture. Since the collapse of the Empire, the British nation has been suffering from a severe cultural identity crisis, considerably exacerbated by the fact that it now sees its socio-economic status, cultural prestige and national identity

in Across the margins
De-scribing Imperial identity from alien to migrant
Peter Childs

discourse only as the West’s immaterial opposite. From the legacy of Huxley, Hesse and Isherwood, the British, from the Beatles to Iris Murdoch (for example, Bruno’s Dream, 1969), sought enlightenment in India just as many of their ancestors claimed to export it there. But to most British people, the sun had set on not just the Empire but the Commonwealth too. At the end of the decade, the editorial of a special sixtieth anniversary edition of The Round Table lamented that [the] fading of the vision of Empire-Commonwealth as an instrument of British world power has

in Across the margins
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Where postcolonialism is neo-orientalist – the cases of Sarojini Naidu and Arundhati Roy
Elleke Boehmer

:john:Public:John's Mac: John's Job Stories of women ways in which the west has always scrutinised and objectified the other, whether the east in the case of India, or the south more generally? Aren’t there elements of this criticism that create a profound sense of déja vu? Have Indian writers not been feted and exceptionalised in this way before, at the height of Empire, and feted in very similar terms? Expanding these questions, the neo-orientalist tendency I want to underline is a critical inclination to regard as more culturally alive, interestingly authentic and intensively

in Stories of women
Theorising the en-gendered nation
Elleke Boehmer

To this the response must be that no matter how widely entrenched the symbols, nor yet how iconoclastic, recuperative or revolutionary the ideology – and its power against empire has indeed been important and immense – nationalism’s vocabularies of self-representation do matter; fundamentally so. As I have emphasised, it is not merely the case that nationalism springs from masculinised iconographies, social memories and state structures (this would be the ‘soft’ argument for the nation as a gendered construct). It is also that, the nation’s liberatory promises to

in Stories of women
Colonialism, Jewishness and politics in Bacon’s New Atlantis
Claire Jowitt

Since the publication of Hakluyt’s ambitious Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques and Discoveries of the English Nation in 1589 – when England’s empire was only embryonic – significant increases in both territory and trade had occurred.5 East Indies trade started to generate large profits; until 1615 the Russia Company was successful in its whaling voyages; in 1618 trade to Africa, controlled by the Africa Company, was re-established; while in 1606, James I issued the First Virginia Charters.6 In the years preceding the New Atlantis’s appearance, then, various

in Francis Bacon’s <i>New Atlantis</i>
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The adolescent girl and the nation
Elleke Boehmer

.12 In Malaya, in a series of darkly ironic scenes that tell strongly against him, an excited yet climactically overwhelmed, sweating Sam shares with his native colleagues his two central eugenicist fantasies. First, there is his concept of ‘the One Great Nation’ (or ‘internation’) of the future, a globalised, US-dominated empire based on his own principle of unequal, international brotherhood. Second, he outlines a fantasy of fathering a family of many-coloured babies, unmistakably a seedbed and prototype for that same Great Nation (MLC 235–9, 247, 311, 380: the

in Stories of women
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Ethnicity and popular music in British cultural studies
Sean Campbell

immigrants was necessarily even-handed. In the preface to The Empire Strikes Back (1982, hereafter Empire), for example, Gilroy acknowledged the relative lack of attention that the authors had paid to the South Asian ethnic group in Britain, explaining: ‘[we] have struck an inadequate balance between the two black communities. Only one of us has roots in the Indian subcontinent whereas four are of Afro-Caribbean origin. This accounts for the unevenness of our text’ (CCCS 1982: 7). Notwithstanding this particular asymmetry, though, the point that I want to make here is that

in Across the margins
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Postcolonial women writers in a transnational frame
Elleke Boehmer

13 14 15 16 17 2:55 PM Page 204 John's G5:Users:john:Public:John's Mac: John's Job Stories of women Rabindranath Tagore and the Politics of Self (New Delhi: Oxford University Press, 1994). As in my own Empire, the National and the Postcolonial, 1890–1920: Resistance in Interaction (Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press, 2002). See also Fredric Jameson and Masoa Miyoshi (eds), The Cultures of Globalisation (Durham, NC and London: Duke University Press, 1998), on paradoxes in contemporary understandings of the global. Susan Bassnett, Comparative

in Stories of women