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The Rotuli de Dominabus et Pueris et Puellis de XII Comitatibus of 1185
Susan M. Johns

facilitate analysis of the broader contexts of noblewomen’s lives. Traditional and empirical historians have generally studied the Rotuli de Dominabus in the context of debates about the nature of royal lordship in the late twelfth century, examining, for example, the character of Angevin government and reform. This has led to an emphasis on the effectiveness or otherwise of Henry II’s government, which has been analysed either narrowly in England or in the wider context of the nature of the Angevin empire. Similarly the roots of Magna Carta have been traced to the reign

in Noblewomen, aristocracy and power in the twelfth-century Anglo-Norman realm
Open Access (free)
Susan M. Johns

affected female sigillographic practice, since the appearance of non-noble women’s seals appears contemporarily in both regions of the Angevin empire.178 Although Scotland was politically independent of the Angevin empire there was cultural symbiosis, with evidence that women were using seals in the mid-twelfth century, since Isabella, the wife of William Wallace, co-sealed a charter with him c. 1160.179 In the mid-twelfth century Margaret duchess of Brittany, the wife of Conan duke of Brittany (d. 1171) and sister of William the Lion, sealed a grant of land in Forset

in Noblewomen, aristocracy and power in the twelfth-century Anglo-Norman realm
James Paz

backdrop for Christian monuments –​ such as those of Ruthwell and Bewcastle –​as a ‘physical manifestation of the old imperium’ which the Church ‘appropriated and redefined’ for its own purpose.33 Stone’s power was bound up with its ability to endure across multiple human lifespans, to outlive the men and women who shaped it into a monument or fortress and to carry the power of the past into the present, its stony life vaster than empires, and more slow.34 So while stone does seem to stand solid and silent before the human, we have always been aware that its stillness

in Nonhuman voices in Anglo-Saxon literature and material culture
Enigmas, agency and assemblage
James Paz

grove.31 Webster, thinking along similar lines, links this, the left side, with the impenetrably pagan right side, since both ‘are set in dangerous wilderness, symbolized by the wood’.32 For other scholars, the anomalies of this carving serve to Christianise the scene. Simmons sees the four shepherds as ‘kneeling’ before Romulus, ‘here an infant, but one who will someday found Rome as its first king’. They therefore ‘represent all the world with its four ends which was made to kneel to the Roman Empire’. They carry spears ‘which signify the war which was necessary for

in Nonhuman voices in Anglo-Saxon literature and material culture
Open Access (free)
Greeks and Saracens inGuy of Warwick
Rebecca Wilcox

and their production, while M. Mills, J. Burton, P. Price, R. Dalrymple, T. Turville-Petre, S. Crane and V. B. Richmond elaborate Guy’s structure, its connections to hagiography and social MUP_McDonald_11_Chap10 217 11/18/03, 17:06 218 Rebecca Wilcox politics, and its analogues in visual art and non-romance literature.4 Yet, despite their interest in the romance, critics have almost entirely ignored one of the central themes in Guy: the hero’s domination of Eastern empires, both Christian and Saracen. This neglect has limited criticism of Guy to fairly local

in Pulp fictions of medieval England
Elisa Narin van Court

scenes inside the city walls where hundreds die daily for lack of food and water, culminating in the surrender of the Jews and their sale into slavery by the Romans. Jerusalem is informed throughout by a variety of sensibilities: religious, political, economic, and social. The Roman crusade against the Jews and Jerusalem is framed by Christian justifications; issues of empire and rule are played out within the Roman camp and between the Romans and the Jews; because the Jews have refused to pay tribute to Rome, the economics of revenge initiate, in part, the original

in Pulp fictions of medieval England
Open Access (free)
Robin Norris

each man his armour; to the fire of some his horse also is added. The tomb is a mound of turf: the difficult and tedious tribute of a monument they reject as too heavy on the dead. Weeping and wailing they put away quickly: sorrow and sadness linger. Lamentation becomes women: men must remember.’). 6 Christopher B. Krebs, A most dangerous book: Tacitus's Germania from the Roman Empire to the Third Reich

in Dating Beowulf
Open Access (free)
Simha Goldin

half of the fourth century, the proselytes indeed constituted a problem. He was evidently exposed in Palestine to the fact that, after the Roman empire became Christian, heavy punishments were imposed upon those who converted to Judaism, to the extent of being sentenced to execution.6 This aphorism continued to echo throughout the history of Judaism, and its various interpretations reflect the essentially suspicious attitude towards the newcomer. Rashi, at the end of the eleventh century, explains the term ‘sore’ by stating that proselytes Goldin, Apostasy and

in Apostasy and Jewish identity in High Middle Ages Northern Europe
Alcuin Blamires

proclaim news of his divine forgiveness. Gowther marries her and they inherit the empire. Sir Gowther has seemed in the past too slight and eccentric, too brusque and melodramatic to attract much serious notice apart from MUP_McDonald_03_Ch2 45 11/18/03, 16:58 46 Alcuin Blamires classificatory investigation of its folktale affiliations and bureaucratic inquiry into its generic status.2 What modicum of attention it has otherwise gained has arisen because it draws upon the discourse of demonology on the one hand and the discourse of penitence on the other. The

in Pulp fictions of medieval England
Le Bone Florence of Rome and bourgeois self-making
Felicity Riddy

expected answer is clearly not ‘Florence, of course’. Florence may inherit but she cannot rule: in fact she is made to faint at this juncture as if to acquiesce in her own incapacity. And so the unequal distribution of public power between men and women perpetuates itself; the landless Emere acquires an empire, Florence sends him away and her nightmares begin. The period I have already identified in which she is neither a daughter nor a wife is the period of the horrific history that gets pieced together at the end of the poem. As bourgeois reading matter, Le Bone

in Pulp fictions of medieval England