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Steve Sohmer

himself, ‘a Hebrew born of Hebrews’ (Philippians 3:5) – Paul changed his name to the Greek Παῦλος = Paulos (Acts 13:9). Paul’s everyday language may have been Greek, the lingua franca of the Roman Empire. His Epistles were certainly written in Greek; his translator, St Jerome (AD 347–420), groaned that Paul’s Greek was inelegant and

in Reading Shakespeare’s mind
Steve Sohmer

, particularly in the presence of ‘damasked’, a word signifying the complex woven fabrics which originated in eleventh-century Damascus, Syria, a city ruled in biblical times by Jewish Israelites before being annexed to the Assyrian Empire in 732 BC. The final couplet which alludes to the ‘breath that from my mistress reeks’ may be a wink at the foetor Judaicus , that distinctive odour

in Reading Shakespeare’s mind
Open Access (free)
Invisibility and erasure in The Two Merry Milkmaids
Chloe Porter

See Paula Findlen, ‘Natural History’, in Katharine Park and Lorraine Daston (eds), The Cambridge History of Science , vol 3: Early Modern Science (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2006 ), pp. 435–68, p. 439. See also Roger French, ‘Pliny and Renaissance Medicine’, in Roger French and Frank Greenaway (eds), Science in the Early Roman Empire: Pliny the

in Making and unmaking in early modern English drama