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The international system and the Middle East
Raymond Hinnebusch

since the (formal) retreat of Western empires. As Sadeq al-Azm has noted, the Arabs and Muslims, viewing themselves as a historically great nation and bearers of God’s true religion, find it hard to accept their domination by the West ( Arab Studies Quarterly , 19:3, 1997, 124). As such, external intervention and its often damaging consequences has stimulated an on-going reaction manifested in nationalist and Islamic movements, in the rise of revisionist states, and in the attempts of regional states to assert autonomy and to restructure

in The international politics of the Middle East
The Marshall Plan films about Greece
Katerina Loukopoulou

) about post-war Germany. Jenning’s films have in general been analysed within the history of the Documentary Film Movement, tightly associated with notions of Britishness. In a sense, this was inevitable, since its origins lay in powerful British institutions of the 1930s and 1940s, such as the Empire Marketing Board (EMB), the General Post Office (GPO), and the Crown Film Unit. However, after the Second

in Global humanitarianism and media culture
Open Access (free)
Television and the politics of British humanitarianism
Andrew Jones

( Abingdon : Routledge , 2015 ), pp. 76 – 91 . 2 The historiography of humanitarianism in particular has been flourishing in recent years. Michael Barnett’s historical overview remains a seminal publication: Empire of Humanity: A History of Humanitarianism (Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 2011). See also Kevin O’Sullivan et al

in Global humanitarianism and media culture
Open Access (free)
Michael Lawrence and Rachel Tavernor

Present ’, in M. Barnett and T. Weiss (eds), Humanitarianism in Question: Politics, Power, Ethics ( Ithaca : Cornell University Press , 2008 ), pp. 1 – 48 . For an authoritative account of the development of humanitarianism since the nineteenth century, see M. Barnett , Empire of Humanity: A History of Humanitarianism ( Ithaca and London : Cornell University Press , 2013 ). For

in Global humanitarianism and media culture
Grassroots exceptionalism in humanitarian memoir
Emily Bauman

. 3 M . Barnett , Empire of Humanity: A History of Humanitarianism ( Ithaca : Cornell University Press , 2011 ), p. 105 . 4 Barnett, Empire of Humanity , p. 108. Tales of the imperfect implementation of this project are legion, often testifying to a blind faith in technology without

in Global humanitarianism and media culture
Impact of structural tensions and thresholds
Eşref Aksu

powers. What seemed ‘internal’ conflicts to the old colonialists (meaning internal to their colonial empires, as in Algeria or Rhodesia) were considered ‘international’ by the superpowers (meaning that the other superpower might intrude into that conflict at any moment). In this sense, the UN’s response to intra-state conflicts could not but reflect an overwhelming preoccupation with international

in The United Nations, intra-state peacekeeping and normative change
Raymond Hinnebusch

tribes, peoples, notably the Arabs, lacked the defined sense of territorial identity and attachment to the land associated with peasant societies. The important exceptions, those societies with substantial peasantries – Turkey, Iran and Egypt – are those where contemporary states most closely approximate national states. Aggravating the situation was the way the contemporary states system was imposed at the expense of a pre-existing cultural unity deriving from centuries of rule by extensive empires ruling in the name of the Islamic umma . Where

in The international politics of the Middle East
Laura Suski

globalized capital, which systematically bear less frequent mention in narratives of toxicity than the cautionary warnings from the seat of US empire.’ 52 Chen’s analysis encourages us to think carefully about the dangers of parenting narratives of protection, as such narratives can easily extend into nationalist narratives. Moreover, against the history of colonialism and empire, the global South becomes a

in Global humanitarianism and media culture
Cinema, news media and perception management of the Gaza conflicts
Shohini Chaudhuri

”: Israel’s Crumbling Media War’, 23 July 2014, http://deepakumar.net/empire-bytes/telegenically-dead-israels-crumbling-media-war/. Accessed 10 September 2016. 18 J. Snow, ‘The Children of Gaza’, 27 July 2014, www.channel4.com/news/the-children-of-gaza-jon-snow-video. Accessed 10 September 2016

in Global humanitarianism and media culture
Eşref Aksu

at stake and the normative preferences that accompanied them. The chapter will conclude by examining the implications of this ambiguity for the ensuing normative synthesis. Historical background Cyprus, the home of a Hellenic civilisation, became part of the Ottoman Empire in 1571. The island came under British rule in 1878. During the decolonisation decade, the trilateral

in The United Nations, intra-state peacekeeping and normative change