This article will query the ethics of making and displaying photographs of human remains. In particular, we will focus on the role of photography in constituting human remains as specimens, and the centrality of the creation and circulation of photographic images to the work of physical anthropology and bioarchaeology. This work has increasingly become the object of ethical scrutiny, particularly in the context of a (post)colonial politics of recognition in which indigenous people seek to recover dominion over their looted material heritage, including the remains of their dead. This ethical concern extends to the question of how and under what circumstances we may display photographs of human remains. Moreover, this is not just a matter of whether and when we should or should not show photographs of the remains of the dead. It is a question of how these images are composed and produced. Our discussion of the ethics of the image is, therefore, indivisible from a consideration of the socio-technical process by which the photographic image is produced, circulated and consumed.

Human Remains and Violence: An Interdisciplinary Journal
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Death, landscape and power among the Duha Tuvinians of northern Mongolia

, theft or magic, which may spread misfortune among the living kin. The sacred artefacts of the Duha are thus, as Caroline Humphrey (2002) has proposed regarding the possessions of the Mongolians, ‘expressive and transformative of persons-in-society’ (2002: 83), since the relationship with possessions is ‘constituted as a matter of character or personality, as an ethical rather than a legal relation’ (2002: 65). The burial sites of the Duha materialise the ethics of the deceased subject, his kin and the state. For example, if the deceased died because of the

in Governing the dead

historical conflicts, colonial oppression and political violence’, in A. Gonzalez-Ruibal & G. Moshenka (ed.), Ethics and the Archaeology of Violence (London: Springer, 2015). 96   José López Mazz 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 J. López Mazz (ed.), ‘Informe de actividades del Grupo de Investigación en Antropología Forense’, Presidencia de la República, 2005; López Mazz & Bracco, Minuanes. López Mazz, ‘Informe de actividades’, 2005. Ibid. Comisión para la Paz, ‘Informe final’. López Mazz, ‘Informe de actividades’, 2005; López Mazz, ‘Informe de actividades’, 2011; López

in Human remains and identification

reference to forms of mass violence in which numerous people are eliminated due to their ideology or political opinion, was discussed in W. H. Moore, ‘Repression and dissent: substitution, context, and timing’, American Journal of Political Science, 42:3 (1998), 851–73; G. Sjoberg, E. Gill, N. Williams & K. E. Kuhn, ‘Ethics, human rights and sociological inquiry: genocide, politicide and other issues of organizational power’, American Sociologist, 26:1 (spring 1995), 8–19. This theme has been treated in several analytical works: E. Abrahamian, Tortured Confessions

in Destruction and human remains

Anthropological Institute of Great Britain and Ireland. Foucault, M. (1997) ‘The ethics of the concern for self as a practice of freedom’, in P. Rabinow (ed.) (trans. R. Hurley), Michel Foucault: Ethics, Subjectivity and Truth, the Essential Works of Michel Foucault 1954–1984, Vol. 1. London: Penguin. Green, S.F. (2009) Lines, Traces and Tidemarks: Reflections on Forms of Borderli-ness, COST 78 Migrating borders and moving times Action IS0803 Working Paper 1. www.eastbordnet.org/working_papers/open/docu ments/Green_Lines_Traces_and_Tidemarks_090414.pdf. Accessed 9 August

in Migrating borders and moving times

the researcher confronted with the material traces of the destruction of bodies? And how do we force ourselves to think the unthinkable, given that the logical and social frameworks which made the production of death on such a scale possible seem to escape any articulations of ordinary reasoning? As regards the question of ethics, how do we avoid voyeurism and provide an intelligible account of the facts without sliding into obscenity? And, insofar as the victims are survived by executioners as well as witnesses (whose potential collaborative role in the violence is

in Human remains and mass violence
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Deaths at sea and unidentified bodies in Lesbos

Sociology, 6(4): 390–408. Leonard, Sarah (2010) ‘EU border security and migration into the European Union: FRONTEX and securitization through practices’, European Security, 19(2): 231–254. Makridakis I. (2010) ‘Συρματενιοι, Ξεσυρματένιοι· Όλοι. Χιώτες πρόσφυγες και στρατιώτες στη Μέση Ανατολή: Αφηγήσεις 1941–1946’ [Syrmatenioi, Xesyrmatenioi, Oloi: Chiot Testimonies of Refugees and Soldiers in the Middle East: 1941–1946]. Athens: Estia. Manners, Ian (2008) ‘The normative ethics of the European Union’, International Affairs, 84(1): 45–60. Migdal, Joel (2001) State in

in Migrating borders and moving times
Integrative concepts for a criminology of mass violence

example of the kinds of activity that could be undertaken. Short of full ethnography, attending a transitional justice arena as an observer in the manner of Hagan’s work 53 on the functioning of the ICTY could also be beneficial. Similar options with regard to qualitative analysis of observational field notes are available. Ethical issues Most university research ethics committees and those of the principal national and international funding councils require a robust ethical engagement with standard issues when research examines human beings. These include: informed

in Human remains and mass violence
Towards atypology of the treatment of corpses of ‘disappeared detainees’ in Argentinafrom 1975 to 1983

, we believe that it would not be problematic to extend the analysis presented here to the rest of the security and armed forces. Prudencio García, El drama de la autonomía militar: Argentina bajo las Juntas Militares (Madrid: Alianza, 1995), p. 35. It has been possible to identify different methods of indoctrination with regard to the Argentine army: informal meetings after the regular courses that took place in training centres; the classes of the standard courses of these centres, mainly in areas such as religion, ethics, and the history of international relations

in Destruction and human remains