Search results

The unknowable image in The Winter’s Tale

Hermione recognises the ‘unknown’ and ‘unknowable’ as ‘other’ and thus constitutes an ethical choice in the sense recommended by Emmanuel Levinas. 23 Levinas defines ethics as a recognition of the ‘other’ that enables the rejection of ‘sovereign reason’ that ‘knows only itself’; as Knapp points out, the ‘other’ in this sense refers to ‘the other person, designated “other”’ as

in Making and unmaking in early modern English drama
Open Access (free)
Invisibility and erasure in The Two Merry Milkmaids

, momentarily demonstrates the efficacy of invisibility as a means of appearing in the visible that enables intervention in perceived corruption. Rather than acquiring special powers of discernment, in occupying the privileged space of the invisible spectator Dorilus acquires enhanced powers of oration and the platform to communicate the ‘Truth’. In his study of vision and ethics in Shakespeare and

in Making and unmaking in early modern English drama
Open Access (free)
Speaking pictures?

. 9 James A. Knapp, Image Ethics in Shakespeare and Spenser (New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2011 ), p. 1. 10 Knapp, Image Ethics , pp. 1–2. 11 Leonard Barkan, ‘Making Pictures Speak: Renaissance Art, Elizabethan

in Making and unmaking in early modern English drama

Ethics , p. 34. 40 See Tessa Watt, Cheap Print and Popular Piety, 1550–1640 , Cambridge Studies in Early Modern British History (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1991), passim. 41 Hamling and Williams

in Making and unmaking in early modern English drama
The ends of incompletion

–20). Notes 1 Stephen Greenblatt, Shakespearean Negotiations: The Circulation of Social Energy in Renaissance England (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1980 ), p. 63. 2 Knapp, Image Ethics , p. 180. 3

in Making and unmaking in early modern English drama
Open Access (free)
Theory and Spenserian practice

genre, so that he could claim the status of an epic poet. Over the centuries, as he became a specimen for anthologies and survey courses, he often became only an epic poet, or sometimes a pastoral poet as well. But   6 For additional discussion of this passage, see McCabe, “Masks,” for an analysis of James’s response, and Ashworth-King, Ethics of Satire, chapter 3, for a discussion of its meaning within the overall context of Spenser’s satirical meanings in the Mercilla episode. MUP_Hile_SpenserSatire_Printer.indd 36 14/10/2016 15:35 Indirect satire 37 in his

in Spenserian satire