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Open Access (free)
Cultural identity and change in the Atlantic archipelago

The concept of 'margins' denotes geographical, economic, demographic, cultural and political positioning in relation to a perceived centre. This book aims to question the term 'marginal' itself, to hear the voices talking 'across' borders and not only to or through an English centre. The first part of the book examines debates on the political and poetic choice of language, drawing attention to significant differences between the Irish and Scottish strategies. It includes a discussion of the complicated dynamic of woman and nation by Aileen Christianson, which explores the work of twentieth-century Scottish and Irish women writers. The book also explores masculinities in both English and Scottish writing from Berthold Schoene, which deploys sexual difference as a means of testing postcolonial theorizing. A different perspective on the notion of marginality is offered by addressing 'Englishness' in relation to 'migrant' writing in prose concerned with India and England after Independence. The second part of the book focuses on a wide range of new poetry to question simplified margin/centre relations. It discusses a historicising perspective on the work of cultural studies and its responses to the relationship between ethnicity and second-generation Irish musicians from Sean Campbell. The comparison of contemporary Irish and Scottish fiction which identifies similarities and differences in recent developments is also considered. In each instance the writers take on the task of examining and assessing points of connection and diversity across a particular body of work, while moving away from contrasts which focus on an English 'norm'.

Open Access (free)
Ethnicity and popular music in British cultural studies
Sean Campbell

7 Sounding out the margins: ethnicity and popular music in British cultural studies SEAN CAMPBELL Introduction In their discussion of the development of British cultural studies,1 Jon Stratton and Ien Ang point out that the ‘energizing impulse’ of the field has ‘historically … lain in [a] critical concern with, and validation of, the subordinate, the marginalized [and] the subaltern within Britain’ (1996: 376). Accordingly, many of the field’s principal practitioners have paid a considerable amount of attention to questions of ‘race’2 and ethnicity in post

in Across the margins
Open Access (free)
Troubling race, ethnicity, and masculinity in Beowulf
Catalin Taranu

reading and listening, it is anxiety that gathered so many audiences around Beowulf for so long a time. The purpose of this chapter, then, is to probe some of the points in the poem that trouble certain audiences in order to understand the ways in which these communities function emotionally in relation to the text. In particular, I pursue this work of emotional archaeology by tracing anxieties around masculinity, ethnicity, and race that found their expression in Beowulf – and that different audiences have projected on to it, first in Beowulf's sexualized encounter

in Dating Beowulf
Open Access (free)
Crossing the margins
Glenda Norquay and Gerry Smyth

obviously in the Runnymede Trust report. We also want, therefore, to examine the possible intersections between geopolitical markers of supposed ‘marginality’ and other boundaries and hierarchies operating in identity politics – gender, ethnicity, class and sexuality in particular. In this arena we believe that insufficient attention had been placed to the relationship between ‘Celtic spaces’ and other areas of ‘difference’, even within the context of emerging concerns around a ‘New Britishness’: As Robert Crawford notes in the afterword to his influential Devolving

in Across the margins
Open Access (free)
Theatre and the politics of engagement
Author: Simon Parry

This book is about science in theatre and performance. It explores how theatre and performance engage with emerging scientific themes from artificial intelligence to genetics and climate change. The book covers a wide range of performance forms from the spectacle of the Paralympics Opening Ceremony to Broadway musicals, from experimental contemporary performance and opera to educational theatre, Somali poetic drama and grime videos. It features work by pioneering companies including Gob Squad, Headlong Theatre and Theatre of Debate as well as offering fresh analysis of global blockbusters such as Wicked and Urinetown. The book offers detailed description and analysis of theatre and performance practices as well as broader commentary on the politics of theatre as public engagement with science. It documents important examples of collaborative practice with extended discussion of the Theatre of Debate process developed by Y Touring theatre company, exploration of bilingual theatre-making in East London and an account of how grime MCs and dermatologists ended up making a film together in Birmingham. The interdisciplinary approach draws on contemporary research in theatre and performance studies in combination with key ideas from science studies. It shows how theatre can offer important perspectives on what the philosopher of science Isabelle Stengers has called ‘cosmopolitics’. The book argues that theatre can flatten knowledge hierarchies and hold together different ways of knowing.

Heidi Hansson

own uncertainty and lack of self-esteem. It proves to her that she has no identity, that she is ‘nothing’ as she repeatedly thinks throughout the novel. In the national story, the search for identity can usually be satisfied through information about genetic – and by extension ethnic – background and identification with the nation, but Enright demythologises many of the staples of older Irish fiction, such as rural farm life, family relationships and the moral superiority of nuns, and she does not replace these old stabilities with a new belief in genetics, which

in Irish literature since 1990
Open Access (free)
Peter Morey

minority community in India, and having subsequently migrated to Canada, Mistry can offer a unique perspective on the multiple accommodations involved in the construction of identities. Indeed, identity forms a key theme in his work and is seen in both personal and national terms. His writing provides a wry, but occasionally tragic perspective on the postcolonial nation of India: a perspective from the margins, so to speak. Likewise, the diverse inheritance he enjoys, both as a postcolonial subject and as a member of an ethnic and religious minority group which

in Rohinton Mistry
De-scribing Imperial identity from alien to migrant
Peter Childs

have become raw materials for creative processes which redefine what it means to be black, adapting it to distinctively British experiences and meanings. (1987: 154) Gilroy sees this model of identity opposed and preferable to those of national, ‘racial’ and ethnic absolutism (1987: 154–7). But in what language is such a change in self-definition conducted and what is at stake in a shift from a discourse that sees polarised identities (dis)located in either rootedness or rootlessness, belonging or alienation, to one that sees them characterised by relocations

in Across the margins
International man of stories
Peter Morey

logic of survival requires some new order, even if only provisional.1 Perhaps this explains Mistry’s fascination with pattern. His characters seek patterns and shapes in the chaos of everyday lives slowly falling apart, sometimes by raiding fond memories, sometimes by reversion to the primal consolations of religious and ethnic identifications, and sometimes, more profitably, by sifting what is valuable in the past and filtering out prejudices Morey_Mistry_07_Ch7 172 9/6/04, 4:16 pm Conclusion 173 which tie them down. The resulting patterns can be interwoven

in Rohinton Mistry
Open Access (free)
Peter Morey

of a growing body of ‘ethnic’ writers within ‘multicultural’ Canada; his writing as ‘diasporic discourse’, articulating a view of both Canada and India from the peripheries; the Indian subject matter he chooses and the influence of his Parsi background; the role of storytelling as both theme and technique; gender politics and the depiction of female characters; and, related to issues of reading and reception, the question of whether Mistry’s style should be viewed as realist or something else. The scale and complexity of this critical engagement has, of course

in Rohinton Mistry