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A Focus on Community Engagement

( Olivier de Sardan, 2005 ): chiefs, women, elders and youths seen as legitimate actors, able to both represent and influence the ‘community’ – that is, to be intermediaries of community engagement between the intervention and local populations. This article shows how both the legitimacy of these actors embodying the response and eventually the intervention itself was contested and negotiated through localised encounters. 1 We present three ethnographic cases based on first-hand, epidemic-related field observations of community engagement and local resistance. The authors

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
From the Global to the Local

context, the Agency’s services are seen as a lifeline for the refugees’ ( UNGA WG, 2016 ). 5 To examine the implications of UNRWA’s operational shifts in such a context, I build upon my long-standing ethnographic research in and about the Palestinian refugee camps in Lebanon and insights from an ongoing research project examining how the members of nine local communities – including Palestinian refugee communities – in Lebanon, Jordan and Turkey have been responding to the arrival and presence of refugees from Syria. 6 As part of this project

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)

This chapter takes the form of a narrative, auto-ethnographic or autobiographical account. In the period between 2002 and 2009, the author had made several visits to New York, and to Manhattan in particular, to the site of Ground Zero, in an attempt to understand the response of New Yorkers to the collapse of the twin towers. She was grappling with the idea of trauma time – the time of openness after an event that throws into doubt what seemed to have been certain – and its political implications. The visit recounted in this chapter took place after a gap of five years, and proved to be a turning point for the author, challenging what she had thought her work was about.

in Change and the politics of certainty
Open Access (free)

14 Faith Chris Toumey I used to be younger. In 1987 I conducted an ethnography of the creationist movement as my dissertation research. Wonderful it was to be in the midst of the granddaddy of science and religion controversies in the years when creationism packaged itself as scientific creationism. That experience filled my head with ideas about relations between science and religion. A note to our European readers, including the British: yes, I realise it is beyond strange that in a major Western nation a large proportion of the population continues to

in Science and the politics of openness
Open Access (free)

enmeshed in dense social networks. As a result, anthropologists have had much to say about patterns in the narration of political experience and about the unarticulated or unacknowledged structures of meaning informing political action. Reliance on first-hand evidence implies both strengths and weaknesses for the study of aggregated processes at the level of ‘regime transition’ and ‘state formation’. The ethnographic perspective provides a rich basis for assessing the empirical substance of state–citizen relations and for detailed deconstructions of the mechanisms of

in Democratization through the looking-glass
Open Access (free)

the impact of the current way of doing things – even the hugely privileged – though in vastly differing ways. EDKINS 9781526119032 PRINT.indd 6 22/02/2019 08:34 introduction 7 In order to address the questions I have set out, a different way of writing is called for. Attention to other forms of expression (theatre, films, images, exhibitions, writings from outside academia) and an autobiographical or auto-ethnographic sensibility can be of assistance. The book is framed by two auto-ethnographic accounts, written ten years apart, one in 2007 and the other in

in Change and the politics of certainty
Open Access (free)
Reflections on the politics of openness in a new world order

, we can draw inspiration. On 22 April 2017, thousands of supporters of science marched in the United States, the UK, indeed hundreds of cities worldwide. The so-called ‘March for Science’ attracted considerable media attention. Such initiatives help raise awareness of the issues facing the science community as a result of the policy uncertainties that Brexit and Trump’s election have unleashed. I also take inspiration from my research subjects in Kansas. Since 2008, I have been visiting the state regularly, conducting ethnographic fieldwork on grassroots Republican

in Science and the politics of openness
Open Access (free)

draw, Kosovo Polje , however, marked the beginning of the end of medieval Serbia. The legends and myths associated with Prince Lazar, the Serb leader at Kosovo Polje , provided an important link between the medieval kingdom and the emergence of a modern Serb national consciousness from the nineteenth century onwards. 9 Regardless of its ethnographic composition (discussed below), Kosovo was regarded as a key part of the

in The Kosovo crisis and the evolution of post-Cold War European security

, that is, in the spiritual hinterlands. Erna Brodber ( 1997 : 98) calls this mode of reclaiming – re-recognizing – your collective self as ‘the hegemony of the spirit’. And she terms the methodology for such retrieval as ‘celestial ethnography’ (Brodber 1997 : 61). A cartographic practice too, no doubt. Brodber expounds this methodology in the novel, Louisiana , which she

in Recognition and Global Politics

in the recent past hardly existed. Imam ShamilЈ in his struggle against the Russians did not know of any nationalities in Dagestan and did not formulate any ‘national’ tasks. For him and his brothers-in-arms at that time the subjects of political confrontation were completely different. The political discourse of that time in Dagestan distinguished between ‘orthodox Muslims’ and ‘those, who called themselves Muslims, but were not’ as the central political opponents. Avar, Dargin, Kumyk, Lezgin, Lak, etc., ‘Dagestani nationalities’ from an ethnographic point of view

in Potentials of disorder