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Owen Davies

emphasizing the link between the prevalence of witchcraft beliefs and levels of religiosity generally. Both historical and ethnographic sources provide ample evidence that people can think in terms of witchcraft without being devoutly religious. The continued belief in witchcraft in modern French society, and elsewhere, needs, therefore, to be analysed within a framework of socio-cultural trends rather than

in Witchcraft Continued
medical pluralism and the search for hegemony
Enrique Perdiguero

Kuschick. 18 Although her work, first published in 1989, was meant to focus on ‘the practices and conceptions of popular medicine in contemporary Spain’ much of her discussion is based on folkloric, anthropological and medical writings from the early part of the century. But with the support of her own and others’ field work she was able to contextualize and qualify the early ethnographic material. The result, though, is that her work tells us more

in Witchcraft Continued
Stephen Mitchell

, and even revolutionize the anthropologist’s understanding of witchcraft, 5 although not without criticism. 6 It was at roughly this stage in the headily percolating ethnographic debate, that the observations of anthropologists were specifically turned to the historical European situation, 7 and with these important developments, the study of European witchcraft changed profoundly. 8 The suitability

in Witchcraft Continued
Open Access (free)
The historian and the male witch
Lara Apps and Andrew Gow

London: Cornell University Press, 1976). 18 Kathleen Biddick, ‘The Devil’s anal eye: Inquisitorial optics and ethnographic authority’, The Shock of Medievalism (Durham and London: Duke University Press, 1998), 105–134: 131. Biddick’s remarks about witchcraft are based almost entirely on a rather selective

in Male witches in early modern Europe
Duncan Sayer

, based on the angle of a grave and the position of the sun. Subsequent investigation of ethnographic evidence reveals that death in pre-industrial society was more likely in the winter because of the cold and the relative scarcity of food (Brown, 1983 ; Rahtz, 1978 ; Bullough, 1983 ; Boddington, 1990 ; Kendall, 1982 ). Also in the 1970s, Lewis Binford observed that archaeological sites were the product of human agency and he hypothesised that they would contain spatial clustering, which could be investigated by studying material remains (Binford, 1971 ). The

in Early Anglo-Saxon cemeteries
Sabina Magliocco

great many reports from men about women’s power to bind with potent love spells, but we do not know whether this reflects women’s actual behaviour, or men’s fears and anxieties. More significant still is the absence of ethnographic attention to women’s ecstatic traditions connected to saints’ cults. It was not until the 1970s that women began to enter the ethnological professions in greater numbers, and conduct fieldwork

in Witchcraft Continued
Open Access (free)
Lara Apps and Andrew Gow

, 29; Andrea Cornwall and Nancy Lindisfarne, ‘Dislocating masculinity: Gender, power and anthropology’, Dislocating Masculinity: Comparative Ethnographies , eds. Andrea Cornwall and Nancy Lindisfarne (London: Routledge, 1994), 11-47: 18. Gender is by no means a simple or uncontested category.While it allows us to distinguish biological from cultural or ‘socially constructed’ differences between male

in Male witches in early modern Europe
Laura Stark

these norms for storytelling. When, on the other hand, the narrator wished to signal that the first act of retributive magical harm was justified, then the story simply did not mention counter-measures at all. 56 The fact that punished sorcerers did not pursue their grudges in the stories’ narratives does not necessarily reflect the ethnographic reality but rather the internal value system of the narratives, as well as the fact that the narratives

in Witchcraft Continued
Open Access (free)
black magic and bogeymen in Northern Ireland, 1973–74
Richard Jenkins

nowhere, stops cars, vanishes into the night without trace’. 69 The field recording archives of the Ulster Folk and Transport Museum contain a number of ‘troubles’-related ghost and banshee stories and others have been published. 70 Burton’s ethnography of the Ardoyne, north Belfast, during 1972–73, mentions local ghost stories, suggesting that ‘the troubles increase the probability of such tales

in Witchcraft Continued
Hans Peter Broedel

Press, 1986), 67. 28 Donald Tuzin, “Cannibalism and Arapesh Cosmology,” in Paula Brown and Donald Tuzin, eds., The Ethnography of Cannibalism (Washington, D.C.: Society for Psychological Anthropology, 1983), 62. 29 “Sunt autem he que contra humane nature inclinationem imo omnium ferarum [lupina tantummodo excepta] proprie speciei infantes vorant et comedere solent.” Malleus, pt. 2, qu. 1, ch. 2, p. 96. Institoris and Spenger are quoting Nider’s description of the witches of Lausane, although they characteristically omit Nider’s immediately preceding remark, that both

in The <i>Malleus Maleficarum</i> and the construction of witchcraft