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The intellectual influence of non-medical research on policy and practice in the Colonial Medical Service in Tanganyika and Uganda
Shane Doyle

Orgies of drink and women: ethnography, morality and STIs in Buhaya When British officials displaced their German predecessors in Buhaya, in north-west Tanganyika, during the First World War, they found themselves in possession of a territory with several unusual features. The introduction of the plantain or cooking banana a thousand or more years before had permitted the

in Beyond the state
John Marriott

including, most significantly, the mapping of India, but also the collection and systematic classification of flora, fauna, ethnology and architecture. The enumerative was driven by the perceived need to collect and classify data. Over time, those on prices, customs, duties and coinage were supplemented by more ethnographic concerns, realized in the massive

in The other empire
Open Access (free)
The predicament of history
Bill Schwarz

and Hoggart (Thompson less so) made their journeys from the provinces to the centred redoubts of English civilisation. They too found themselves compelled to compile their ethnographic accounts and political audits of the ‘traditions which were called England’, fully aware that in so doing they were exploring the mechanisms by which a civilisation simultaneously organised structures of

in West Indian intellectuals in Britain
Open Access (free)
John Marriott

The sources of such a racial typography were evident from references made to contemporary ethnographical work, most notably that of James Prichard, 60 whose influential Natural History of Man 61 had been republished the year before Mayhew began his survey, and from which Mayhew quotes ideas concerning distinctive physical characteristics. From a humanitarian perspective and in ways that

in The other empire
Open Access (free)
Julie Evans, Patricia Grimshaw, David Philips, and Shurlee Swain

Transformation of Anthropology: The Politics and Poetics of an Ethnographic Event (London: Cassell, 1999), p. 1. 6 Thomas, Colonialism’s Culture , pp. ix–x. Generally, see: R. Pares, ‘The Economic Factors in the History of Empire’, in R. A. and E. Humphreys (eds), The Historian’s Business and Other Essays (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1961), pp

in Equal subjects, unequal rights
Open Access (free)
Charles V. Reed

-century colonial culture were the ‘Cape Malays’ of the second half of the nineteenth century and the ‘Cape Coloureds’ of the twentieth century. I sometimes use contemporary language, both to reflect historical usage and to challenge the ethnic and racial determinism of twentieth-century ethnography. For instance, I describe Moshoeshoe, the paramount chief of modern-day Lesotho, as the ‘Basuto’ king to destabilise

in Royal tourists, colonial subjects and the making of a British world, 1860–1911
Open Access (free)
John Marriott

the whole of India. At the height of the campaign in 1840, 3,689 Thugs were committed; of these, 466 were hanged, 1,504 transported and 933 sentenced to life imprisonment. 84 Radical new techniques of ethnographic classification were also introduced. Here, Henry Spry, medical officer of Sagar, appeared on the scene. In the interests of science, he forwarded to the phrenological society at Edinburgh

in The other empire
Open Access (free)
One or two ‘honorable cannibals’ in the House?
Julie Evans, Patricia Grimshaw, David Philips, and Shurlee Swain

: John Harris, One Blood: 200 Years of Aboriginal Encounter with Christianity (Sutherland, NSW: Albatross Books, 1990); Henry Reynolds, This Whispering in Our Hearts (Melbourne: Penguin, 1999); Tony Swain and Deborah Bird Rose (eds), Aboriginal Australians and Christian Missions: Ethnographic and Historical Studies (Bedford Park, South Australia: AASR, 1988

in Equal subjects, unequal rights
Open Access (free)
Mary Chamberlain

, it was as much a decolonisation of the mind, an affirmation of pride and identity, as a manifesto for political autonomy. It was making links with a common black encounter that could unite this experience in the Caribbean, America, Europe and Africa. The papers ranged in style and content, from scientific treatises on ‘The tonal structure of Yoruba poetry’, to representations of ethnography, from

in West Indian intellectuals in Britain
Charles V. Reed

Maoris, to be actuated by sudden and fanatical impulses’. 92 Bowen’s failure to make sense of Kingitanga is reflected in his troubled ethnography of Maori motives. As diplomatic messages passed between the government, the Maori king, and other Maori chiefs, the settler press was accusing Tawhiao of planning an uprising and of supporting Te Kooti’s raids on the North Island. 93

in Royal tourists, colonial subjects and the making of a British world, 1860–1911