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A Focus on Community Engagement
Frédéric Le Marcis, Luisa Enria, Sharon Abramowitz, Almudena-Mari Saez and Sylvain Landry B. Faye

We present three ethnographic cases based on first-hand, epidemic-related field observations of community engagement and local resistance. The authors were involved in diverse ways in Sierra Leone (Luisa Enria), Liberia (Almudena Mari Saez 2 ) and Guinea (Frédéric Le Marcis and Sylvain Landry B. Faye) and as part of the global response coordination (Sharon Abramowitz). These case studies, directly observed by the authors, present three community engagement encounters

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Rethinking Digital Divides by Linda Leung
Antonio Díaz Andrade

principles of the user-centred design that would contribute to removing these barriers, she relies on ethnographic research. From the accounts given by participants from different demographic characteristics, she develops user personas. The information gathered allowed her to prototype four resource-kit units around telephones (both landlines and mobile phones) as part of a training programme for resettled refugees. The proposed user-centred design training programme is three-pronged: it takes into

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
From the Global to the Local
Elena Fiddian-Qasmiyeh

context, the Agency’s services are seen as a lifeline for the refugees’ ( UNGA WG, 2016 ). 5 To examine the implications of UNRWA’s operational shifts in such a context, I build upon my long-standing ethnographic research in and about the Palestinian refugee camps in Lebanon and insights from an ongoing research project examining how the members of nine local communities – including Palestinian refugee communities – in Lebanon, Jordan and Turkey have been responding to the arrival and presence of refugees from Syria. 6 As part of this project

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Peter C. Little

6 Witnessing e-­waste through participatory photography in Ghana Peter C. Little Introduction Drawing on extended ethnographic research in Agbogbloshie, an urban scrapyard in Accra, Ghana that has become the subject of a contentious electronic waste (e-­waste) narrative, this chapter explores the extent to which citizen1 photography and similar participatory visual research efforts augment contemporary toxic studies in general and e-­waste studies in particular. Attuned to the visual promises, politics, and possibilities of photography in toxic landscapes

in Toxic truths
Open Access (free)
Environmental justice and citizen science in a post-truth age
Editors: Thom Davies and Alice Mah

This book examines the relationship between environmental justice and citizen science, focusing on enduring issues and new challenges in a post-truth age. Debates over science, facts, and values have always been pivotal within environmental justice struggles. For decades, environmental justice activists have campaigned against the misuses of science, while at the same time engaging in community-led citizen science. However, post-truth politics has threatened science itself. This book makes the case for the importance of science, knowledge, and data that are produced by and for ordinary people living with environmental risks and hazards. The international, interdisciplinary contributions range from grassroots environmental justice struggles in American hog country and contaminated indigenous communities, to local environmental controversies in Spain and China, to questions about “knowledge justice,” citizenship, participation, and data in citizen science surrounding toxicity. The book features inspiring studies of community-based participatory environmental health and justice research; different ways of sensing, witnessing, and interpreting environmental injustice; political strategies for seeking environmental justice; and ways of expanding the concepts and forms of engagement of citizen science around the world. While the book will be of critical interest to specialists in social and environmental sciences, it will also be accessible to graduate and postgraduate audiences. More broadly, the book will appeal to members of the public interested in social justice issues, as well as community members who are thinking about participating in citizen science and activism. Toxic Truths includes distinguished contributing authors in the field of environmental justice, alongside cutting-edge research from emerging scholars and community activists.

Open Access (free)
Jenny Edkins

This chapter takes the form of a narrative, auto-ethnographic or autobiographical account. In the period between 2002 and 2009, the author had made several visits to New York, and to Manhattan in particular, to the site of Ground Zero, in an attempt to understand the response of New Yorkers to the collapse of the twin towers. She was grappling with the idea of trauma time – the time of openness after an event that throws into doubt what seemed to have been certain – and its political implications. The visit recounted in this chapter took place after a gap of five years, and proved to be a turning point for the author, challenging what she had thought her work was about.

in Change and the politics of certainty
Open Access (free)
Chris Toumey

14 Faith Chris Toumey I used to be younger. In 1987 I conducted an ethnography of the creationist movement as my dissertation research. Wonderful it was to be in the midst of the granddaddy of science and religion controversies in the years when creationism packaged itself as scientific creationism. That experience filled my head with ideas about relations between science and religion. A note to our European readers, including the British: yes, I realise it is beyond strange that in a major Western nation a large proportion of the population continues to

in Science and the politics of openness
Open Access (free)
Jeremy Gould

enmeshed in dense social networks. As a result, anthropologists have had much to say about patterns in the narration of political experience and about the unarticulated or unacknowledged structures of meaning informing political action. Reliance on first-hand evidence implies both strengths and weaknesses for the study of aggregated processes at the level of ‘regime transition’ and ‘state formation’. The ethnographic perspective provides a rich basis for assessing the empirical substance of state–citizen relations and for detailed deconstructions of the mechanisms of

in Democratization through the looking-glass
Open Access (free)
Jenny Edkins

the impact of the current way of doing things – even the hugely privileged – though in vastly differing ways. EDKINS 9781526119032 PRINT.indd 6 22/02/2019 08:34 introduction 7 In order to address the questions I have set out, a different way of writing is called for. Attention to other forms of expression (theatre, films, images, exhibitions, writings from outside academia) and an autobiographical or auto-ethnographic sensibility can be of assistance. The book is framed by two auto-ethnographic accounts, written ten years apart, one in 2007 and the other in

in Change and the politics of certainty
The “Clean City” law in São Paulo, Brazil
Marina Da Silva

kinds of methods can be put in place to investigate the physiological and sociological effect of visual pollution. The creation of such methods requires citizen participation. Perhaps the most relevant process for this type of inquiry is considering a multimodal approach to research, including citizen science, qualitative research, and ethnography as a way to analyze how classification as pollution impacts different actors and their agencies. Visual pollution and the city: Sensing different modes of experience In 2014, I conducted a series of urban walks in São Paulo

in Toxic truths