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The daily work of Erich Muhsfeldt, chief of the crematorium at Majdanek concentration and extermination camp, 1942–44
Elissa Mailänder

work to­gether, how they joke and quarrel. Central to the everyday history, as developed by Lüdtke, is the question of domination (Herrschaft) or, rather, domination as a social practice.60 Everyday life is not an apolitical vacuum; rather, it is everyday life that is the principal generator of mastery, through the social practice of all those affected, through their perceptions and interpretations, their actions and modes of expression. The institution of the concentration camp created the framework and the National Socialist ideology created the goal for violent

in Destruction and human remains
Open Access (free)
Music-making as creative intervention
Nicola Scaldaferri

the circumscribed timespans of research and fieldwork but is a constant presence or a sharing of everyday life. For this reason Narayan, writing on the figure of the native researcher, suggested how a rigidly dualistic paradigm should be replaced by a rethinking of a researcher’s role, which is characterised by ‘shifting identifications’ ( 1993 : 671) and the quality of the relationship thus created. In my community of origin, my presence was never perceived as neutral and detached. I was often explicitly required to provide a concrete contribution, thanks to my

in Sonic ethnography
Kathryn Cassidy

border during crossings and interviews about border crossings with a grounded, situated approach that enables an understanding of narratives and representations of border crossing in everyday life away from borders themselves. In this chapter, I draw on 15 months of ethnographic fieldwork in the Ukrainian– Romanian borderlands, which included more than 6 months of participant observation in Diyalivtsi, a village in the Chernivets’ka region of Ukraine, just 4 km from the main road between the region’s two main urban centres – Chernivtsi and Suceava. I begin this

in Migrating borders and moving times
Open Access (free)
Theoretical approaches
Finn Stepputat

sight of a corpse is the distance that they put between themselves and violence’ (2006: 44). 14 Finn Stepputat For Bataille (1991) the constant containment or repression of the fear of death and the sentiments that death produces characterises the profane domain of everyday life. This includes in particular the taboo against killing, while its transgression characterises the sacred domain of sovereignty, what Mbembe (2003) calls the domain of death. In Bataille’s interpretation, sovereignty is intrinsically embedded in the body and in life as a biological force

in Governing the dead
Yehonatan Alsheh

killing factory, in which the high-pressure slaughter characteristic of the battlefield and the slaughter pit takes place almost daily over a long duration of time • normal, ‘everyday life’ sites turned sites of mass death such as: oo the village oo the urban setting oo the bombarded area • but also non-bounded sites of mass death over extended time spans, in which the survivors are forced to move on, leaving the corpses behind, such as the trail marched during forced expulsions and death marches • and last but far from being least, societies on their own territory

in Human remains and mass violence
Open Access (free)
Crossing borders, changing times
Madeleine Hurd, Hastings Donnan, and Carolin Leutloff-Grandits

at historic places. Authoritarian sub-national time-spaces exist in state institutions (schools, nurseries, prisons, hospitals, factories, offices), and therewith structure our everyday life and worldview from early childhood, often unconsciously. Massey (1991) finds great exclusionary potential in the combination of time and space. With advancing globalisation and the use of new communication technologies, the compression of space and time leads not only to an elision of spatial and temporal distances (Harvey 1989), but also to places becoming romanticised and

in Migrating borders and moving times
Élisabeth Anstett

be said to cover the entirety of the territory of the former USSR.14 The economic exploitation HRMV.indb 183 01/09/2014 17:28:43 184  Élisabeth Anstett of the Soviet concentration camps thus helped to weave the gulags into the most ordinary spaces of everyday life: factories and hos­ pitals, universities and residential buildings, roads and canals, mines, forests and farms.15 Any part of the territory of the former USSR is liable to harbour traces of this aspect of the country’s past. The high degree of communication between these places of detention and the

in Human remains and mass violence
Olivier Thomas Kramsch

) The Dialectics of Seeing: Walter Benjamin and the Arcades Project. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press. Crary, Jonathan (1990) Techniques of the Observer: On Vision and Modernity in the Nineteenth Century. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press. Cresswell, Tim (2006) On the Move: Mobility in the Modern Western World. New York: Routledge. Cresswell, Tim and P. Merriman (eds) (2011) Geographies of Mobilities: Practices, Spaces, Subjects. Aldershot: Ashgate. de Certeau, Michel (1984) The Practice of Everyday Life. Berkeley: University of California Press. Green, Sarah (2012) ‘A sense of border

in Migrating borders and moving times
Open Access (free)
Corpse-work in the prehistory of political boundaries
Richard Kernaghan

9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 201 As a trans-historical force that ‘exists’, as Nietzsche suggested (1994), ‘at all times or could possibly re-occur’, political prehistory can be considered here a mode of temporality that belongs to the foundational violence of a prior legal order but which secretly inheres in the everyday life of the present. A significant scholarly literature has attempted, if not to answer these specific questions, then to provide abundant historical and ethnographic contexts to understand the distinctiveness of the Shining Path as a

in Governing the dead
Nataša Gregorič Bon

contributions.10 Although, as we saw earlier, 25 per cent of marriages in the village are translocal, the absence of migrant wives is rarely mentioned or openly discussed. Naso often said that he ‘felt’ his wife’s presence in his everyday life, due to regular phone calls and the receipt of things she sent him. But in other respects her contributions went unremarked, like those of other migrant village women. Housekeeping, usually the domain of women, is now carried out by the men, sometimes with help from relatives or with hired help, while the material flows that contribute

in Migrating borders and moving times