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Charlotte Dale

Needham Papers, NCUACS 54/3/95 File A.624, Cambridge University Archives. 35 E. C. Laurence, A Nurse’s Life in War and Peace (London: Smith, Elder and Co., 1912), p. 282. 36 ‘The Nursing Board: Queen Alexandra’s Imperial Military Nursing Service’. 37 H. Dampier, ‘The treatment of “Everyday Life” in memory and narrative of the concentration camps of the South African War, 1899–1902’, in N. Kelly, C. Horrocks, K. Milnes, B. Roberts and D. Robinson (eds), Narrative, Memory and Everyday Life (Huddersfield: University of Huddersfield, 2005), p. 188. 38 Dampier, ‘The

in Colonial caring
Martin D. Moore

management during the first half of the twentieth century, this chapter extends recent discussion of how political, medical and popular lay agencies came to reread wide areas of governance and everyday life in psychological and emotional terms during the interwar and early post-war period. 5 Though efforts to constitute the ‘good diabetic’ were rarely based on systematic or academic models of ‘depth psychology’ such as psychoanalysis, they nonetheless constituted affective relations as central to human behaviour, and sought

in Balancing the self
Open Access (free)
Balancing the self in the twentieth century
Mark Jackson and Martin D. Moore

. 15 Similarly, although advice to balance marriages or to ensure work-life balance was framed explicitly in terms of enabling personal and family health, individualised techniques for achieving ‘balance’, or at least the illusion of balance, represented another manifestation of contemporary political economy and the disciplinary effects of ‘empowerment’ typical of the neo-liberalisation of everyday life. 16 This collection of essays argues that concepts

in Balancing the self
Open Access (free)
Teaching ‘relaxed living’ in post-war Britain
Ayesha Nathoo

Meares and Madders tended to encourage combining elements from a number of available techniques, without privileging one method over another. Concerns abounded, however, over the status and qualifications of the increasing number of self-fashioned relaxation teachers, impacting on the reputation of the field as a whole. As Madders told attendees of a conference on ‘Stress in Everyday Life’ in 1974: During the past ten years there has been an unprecedented interest in somatic enterprises which claim

in Balancing the self
Mark Jackson

rates of divorce across the post-war decades, particularly among those aged between 35 and 49. According to the British 1946 Denning Committee on Procedure in Matrimonial Causes, it was the exhausting ‘mechanics of everyday life’ that were reducing women's marital satisfaction and happiness in particular. 87 Ten years later, the widely discussed Royal Commission on Marriage and Divorce suggested that friction between husbands and wives, and any resultant family instability, could be traced to socio-economic factors

in Balancing the self
Open Access (free)
The hygienic utopia in Jules Verne, Camille Flammarion, and William Morris
Manon Mathias

: Metropolitan Books, 1999); E. O'Connor, Raw Material: Producing Pathology in Victorian Culture (London/Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 2000); W. Menninghaus, Disgust: The Theory and History of a Strong Sensation , trans. H. Eiland and J. Golb (New York: State University of New York Press, 2003); K. Forde (ed.), Dirt: The Filthy Reality of Everyday Life (London: Profile Books, 2011). 13 C. Hamlin, Public

in Progress and pathology
Visualising obesity as a public health concern in 1970s and 1980s Britain
Jane Hand

, healthy or unhealthy, self or other. 43 This duality in health advice enabled the HEC, and by extension the state, to ‘shape food preferences and beliefs in everyday life, to support some food choices and militate against others, and to contribute to the construction of subjectivity and embodied experiences’. 44 The role of the state in this process raises questions about the nature of citizenship in 1970s and 1980s Britain. The rise

in Balancing the self
Open Access (free)
Bonnie Evans

role since the 1980s. Tests for autism have become part of everyday life; they have shaped understandings of child development for everyone from government officials and policy advisers to educational psychologists and teachers to parents and, not least, to children themselves. A lot of information has been collected but, similarly to intelligence tests, these tests have reached a limit in their

in The metamorphosis of autism
The emergence of bioethics in British universities
Duncan Wilson

philosophy ‘should be proportionate to the cuts suffered by other disciplines’.80 To support their argument, the NCP framed philosophy as an increasingly practical discipline, with growing numbers of philosophers now ‘applying their insights to other disciplines, and to the philosophical and ethical problems of everyday life’.81 At the same time, A. J. Ayer and Mary Warnock publicly asserted that philosophy was vital to maintaining a society that valued reasoned debate, analytical rigour and intellectual originality, and protested that the government and the UGC’s ‘new

in The making of British bioethics
Open Access (free)
Perceiving, describing and modelling child development
Bonnie Evans

psychological experts who claimed to have a theory of human relations based on wider political models of social interaction. The book explores these other models in depth and argues that they offered the potential for new types of political engagement. One of the critical points concerning the history of the governance of everyday life in Britain, highlighted by Rose, is the fact that the idea of ‘the social’ is

in The metamorphosis of autism