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The oddity of democracy

, and does so as an element in a polity with other elements, with which, when the modus vivendi works, it conflicts, jars, compromises, and accommodates. The visibility of a sovereign democracy has been located in streets, in dress, in the courtesies of everyday life. Arriving in Barcelona in 1936, George Orwell reported that ‘Waiters and shop-walkers looked you in the face and treated you as an equal. Servile and even ceremonial terms of speech had temporarily disappeared.’ 27 From a different political direction, Herbert Morrison, reflecting on

in Cultivating political and public identity
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Entanglements and ambiguities

Italian “micro-history” and German “Altagsgeschichte” (history of everyday life). 62 Finally, it is against this backdrop that such storylines sketch the problems and potentialities of social/cultural history, including the dialogue with anthropology or sociology, in diverse institutional contexts in the here and now. Once more, the difficulties with such storylines are not

in Subjects of modernity

-specific demoi, as Bauböck puts it (pp. 11–12). But nor are many non-state communities. The regulatory breadth of communities, state and non-state, is also contingent. States are constrained in their reach in various ways. Just as bye-laws set association rules, constitutions and other governing instruments set the limits of state power. In terms of effect on everyday life, state rules may be less intrusive than the rules of the non-state communities

in Democratic inclusion

’ or representations of the Arctic as a political space set the parameters for possible political action. A robust representation of any policy object most often delimits the kinds of The power politics of representation     39 actors, rhetoric and practices that are recognised as ‘relevant’, ‘practical’ and ‘useful’. Analytical attention to framing is a feature of the broader literature on the social construction of space. This literature resulted from a sense for the shortcomings of purely temporal explanations in accounting for how the fabric of everyday life

in Arctic governance

culture which nationalists seek to create is frequently composed in part of a distinctiveness in dress, and an attempt to spread, develop, recover, or rediscover distinct nationalist forms of clothing. In Hungary in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, there was an attention to early or original Magyar forms of appearance and decoration, and the incorporation of designs and motifs from a supposed Magyar origin into the fabric, literally, of everyday life. 53 Iconic images from folk art became embedded in a national identity cultivated in costumes, in

in Cultivating political and public identity
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. Identification with the nation, that ‘super-individual’ made of a collective ‘we’, can give individuals a sense of power, control, glory, success, greatness that they rarely, if ever, achieve in mundane, everyday life. Membership of a nation is bound up with notions of collective consciousness. Increased contact with other national groups can stimulate consciousness of national differences, cultivate a feeling of

in Understanding political ideas and movements
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An introduction

Pierre Bourdieu , Outline of a Theory of Practice, trans. Richard Nice ( Cambridge : Cambridge University Press , 1977 ); Michel de Certeau , The Practice of Everyday Life , trans. Steven F. Rendall ( Berkeley : University of California Press , 1984 ); Reinhart Koselleck , The Practice of Conceptual History: Timing

in Subjects of modernity
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The autonomous life?

costs and benefits of their action – or by exchanging goods in a political market. They also seek goods which are not measurable and cannot be calculated. Contemporary social movements … have shifted towards a non-political terrain: the need for self-realization in everyday life. In this respect social movements have a conflictual and antagonistic, but not a political orientation, because they challenge the logic of complex systems on cultural grounds. (Melucci 1989 : 23

in The autonomous life?
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or corridor can constitute the skeletal remains of an entire social order. In everyday life the assumptions if not the methods of the archaeologist are applied to discern the identity which people are cultivating. The smallest artefact can constitute part of an expressed identity. A door knocker, a carriage lamp, or the pattern of a curtain serves as a shorthand summary for a lifestyle and a life; the curve of a drive or the shape of a flower bed sets down a conception of order and elegance and the discernment of the persons who enjoy them. When

in Cultivating political and public identity
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: On the level of everyday life, authenticity is thematized by such questions as whether a person is “real” – straightforward, truthful, and sincere. Action will be viewed as real if it appears sui generis, the product of a self-generating actor who is not pulled like a puppet by the strings of society. An authentic person seems to act without artifice without self-consciousness, without reference to some laboriously thought out plan or text, without concern for manipulating the

in The autonomous life?