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Open Access (free)
Jenny Edkins

to know more. How could I understand my father and his all too violent concern for me if I did not know more of his father? It was not difficult to trace him, the missing grandfather. Absurd in a way, since we seem to spend all our lives trying to piece together traces of people we are close to in the hope of finding out who they – and we – are. Searches of the Register of Deaths in Somerset House showed that he had died when I was twelve. I managed to trace more of the family history – motivated now by all the questions I had failed to ask as a child, I combed the

in Change and the politics of certainty
Open Access (free)
Jenny Edkins

, then we have the potential to resist interpellation’s colonising move. The monotheistic god’s-eye view becomes difficult to sustain in the face of the vagaries and specificities of our own lives and their various demands and engagements. We are not separate, objective academics, gazing down at the planet and attempting to save it, but fragile, mortal beings who are part and parcel of the ecosystem, as well as of the geopolitical and family histories into which we are born. And yet, it is very tempting to think otherwise. It is hard, especially for someone authorised

in Change and the politics of certainty
Open Access (free)
Potentials of disorder in the Caucasus and Yugoslavia
Jan Koehler
and
Christoph Zürcher

. (1997) The Population of Georgia (Tbilisi). Rothchild, D. (1986), ‘Inter-ethnic conflict and policy analysis in Africa’, Ethnic and Racial Studies, 9:1 (January), 66–86. Rubin, B. R. and J. Snyder, ‘Introduction’, in B. R. Rubin and J. Snyder (eds), Post-Soviet Political Order. Conflict and State Building (London and New York). Tishkov, V. (1997), Ethnicity, Nationalism and Conflict in and after the Soviet Union. The Mind Aflame (London). Todorova, M. (1990), ‘Myth-making in European family history: the zadruga reconsidered’, East European Politics and Societies, 4:1, 30

in Potentials of disorder
Open Access (free)
Language games in the Kosovo war
Mika Aaltola

neighbours; and because we don’t want the twenty-first century to be dominated by the dark marriage of modern weapons and ancient ethnic, racial and religious hatred. We cannot simply watch as hundreds of thousands of people are brutalised, murdered, raped, forced from their homes, their family histories erased – all in the name of ethnic pride and

in Mapping European security after Kosovo