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Studies in intimacy

Featuring essays from some of the most prominent voices in early medieval English studies, Dating Beowulf: studies in intimacy playfully redeploys the word ‘dating’, which usually heralds some of the most divisive critical impasses in the field, to provocatively phrase a set of new relationships with an Old English poem. This volume presents an argument for the relevance of the early Middle Ages to affect studies and vice versa, while offering a riposte to anti-feminist discourse and opening avenues for future work by specialists in the history of emotions, feminist criticism, literary theory, Old English literature, and medieval studies alike. To this end, the chapters embody a range of critical approaches, from queer theory to animal studies and ecocriticism to Actor-Network theory, all organized into clusters that articulate new modes of intimacy with the poem.

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Bronwen Price

Atlantis. Aughterson’s essay provides an analysis of the complex formulation of gender in Bacon’s text, arguing against the tendency of feminist criticism to view Bacon as the founding father of a thoroughly masculinised science. Instead, she shows how concepts of sexual difference and gender in the New Atlantis are connected to the ‘re-visioning’ across a range of areas that takes place in the text. By closely analysing its rhetoric, metaphors and allusions, Aughterson argues that Bacon’s fable questions clearcut sexual hierarchies and articulates a version of

in Francis Bacon’s New Atlantis
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Incest and beyond
Jenny DiPlacidi

). 2 Diana Wallace and Andrew Smith (eds), The Female Gothic: New Directions (Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2009). 3 Lauren Fitzgerald points to the binary of male/female oppression found in Gothic plots as replicated through the conventions of feminist criticism that seeks to liberate the

in Gothic incest
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Colonial body into postcolonial narrative
Elleke Boehmer

reading by Mary Jacobus. See Mary BOEHMER Makeup 3/22/05 2:55 PM Page 139 John's G5:Users:john:Public:John's Mac: John's Job Colonial body into postcolonial narrative 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 139 Jacobus, ‘Readings in hysteria’, in Reading Woman: Essays in Feminist Criticism (New York: Columbia University Press, 1986), pp. 195–274. Jacobus, Reading Woman, p. 197. Mungo Park, Travels in the Interior of Africa (London: The Folio Society, 1984). Richard Burton, Love, War and Fancy: The Customs and Manners of the East from Writings on the

in Stories of women
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Robin Norris

to Beowulf are by line number from this edition, hereafter referred to as Klaeber 4 . 2 What I object to is fetishization of Hildeburh in the service of creating a through-line from Tacitus to the Victorians to the present day, allowing us to ignore men's sadness by overemphasizing women's sorrow. The figure of the mourning woman became the focus of important feminist criticism such as Joyce Hill's ‘Þæt wæs geomuru ides! A

in Dating Beowulf
Anu Koivunen, Katariina Kyrölä and Ingrid Ryberg

embodiment, ethics, affect, and ontology (Ahmed and Stacey, 2001; Clough and Halley, 2007; Garber et  al., 2000; Koivunen, 2001; 2010). Furthermore, it coincides with what Robyn Wiegman (2014) has termed the reparative ‘turn’ in queer feminist criticism. However, the history and routes of the concept’s travels are much longer and more complex. Invoked in the 1980s in the fields of moral and political philosophy (Goodin, 1985; 1988; Nussbaum, 1986), the concept subsequently travelled across disciplines:  from sociology and social policy studies (McLaughlin, 2012; Misztal

in The power of vulnerability
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Disrupting the critical genealogy of the Gothic
Jenny DiPlacidi

almost exclusively as the rape of girls by older male family members. 37 That such formations of this incest paradigm coincided with feminist criticism’s reclamation of the Female Gothic in the 1970s undoubtedly determined literary scholarship to read incest in the Gothic as representative of violent sexual aggression. 38 Seminal works on the Female Gothic by scholars such as Ellen

in Gothic incest
Gender, sexual difference and knowledge in Bacon’s New Atlantis
Kate Aughterson

and the Scientific Revolution (San Francisco, Harper and Row, 1980), pp. 164–90; Maria Mies and Vandana Shiva, Ecofeminism (London and New York, Zed Books, 1993), pp. 13–20; Valerie Plumwood, Feminisms and the Mastery of Nature (London, Routledge, 1993); Londa Schiebinger, The Mind has No Sex?: Women in the Origins of Modern Science (Cambridge, Mass., Harvard University Press, 1989), pp. 119–59. In solitary contrast, Iddo Landau, ‘Feminist criticisms of metaphors in Bacon’s philosophy of science’, Philosophy, 73 (1998), 47–61, demonstrates how critics cite Bacon

in Francis Bacon’s New Atlantis
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Representations of the house in the poetry of Eiléan Ní Chuilleanáin and Vona Groarke
Lucy Collins

9780719075636_4_008.qxd 16/2/09 9:25 AM Page 142 8 Architectural metaphors: representations of the house in the poetry of Eiléan Ní Chuilleanáin and Vona Groarke Lucy Collins Feminist criticism frequently employs metaphors of space to interrogate the position of women within society and their ability to articulate that position to a wider world. The idea of ‘clearing a space’ from which to speak suggests that for women freedom of expression can only be achieved in ‘empty’ space, space that is unmarked by ideological and aesthetic convictions. Yet such

in Irish literature since 1990
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Elleke Boehmer

’s initial excoriating critique.33 (Feminist criticism has contended contra Jameson, for example, that women’s texts focused on the family are not always necessarily intended as emblems of the body politic, although these texts may recognise at the same time that the family is part of that body politic, and may choose to symbolise it.34) Given the essay’s influence, however, and that way in which it has become virtually paradigmatic in readings of writers ranging from Salman Rushdie and Shashi Tharoor, through Tsitsi Dangarembga and Ngugi wa Thiong’o, to Ian McEwan and

in Stories of women