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Incest and beyond
Jenny DiPlacidi

). 2 Diana Wallace and Andrew Smith (eds), The Female Gothic: New Directions (Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2009). 3 Lauren Fitzgerald points to the binary of male/female oppression found in Gothic plots as replicated through the conventions of feminist criticism that seeks to liberate the

in Gothic incest
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Disrupting the critical genealogy of the Gothic
Jenny DiPlacidi

almost exclusively as the rape of girls by older male family members. 37 That such formations of this incest paradigm coincided with feminist criticism’s reclamation of the Female Gothic in the 1970s undoubtedly determined literary scholarship to read incest in the Gothic as representative of violent sexual aggression. 38 Seminal works on the Female Gothic by scholars such as Ellen

in Gothic incest
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Regina Maria Roche, the Minerva Press, and the bibliographic spread of Irish gothic fiction
Christina Morin

condemnations have been repeated with regularity until very recently, defying the considerable reprint and translation history Maturin's novels enjoyed, while also ignoring the substantial impact Maturin had on contemporary authors and those that followed him. 57 Similarly, Owenson's controversial and flamboyant style ruled her out of much serious scholarly attention until feminist criticism in the second half of the twentieth century revived interest in her oeuvre . 58 Roche, too, clearly fell prey to the prevailing critical view of Minerva Press productions as debased

in The gothic novel in Ireland, c. 1760–1829
Re-examining paradigms of sibling incest
Jenny DiPlacidi

this inclination in order to promote group or social growth. Feminist criticism has remained largely silent on the instances of brother–sister desire, which far from seeming threatening, in many cases exemplify an ideal relationship. In addition to the paternal threat model, the understanding of representations of sibling incest as a form of Romantic narcissism has been taken up by

in Gothic incest
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Thefts, violence and sexual threats
Jenny DiPlacidi

casting writers like Radcliffe in the role of the heroine beleaguered by male critic villains. 56 Such criticism is not unjust; much scholarship has been devoted to repositioning Radcliffe in light of Matthew Lewis and her male critics such as Sir Walter Scott, while even more has focused on ownership, inheritance and property in her novels. 57 Fitzgerald ultimately links feminist criticism’s fixation on property to a desire to

in Gothic incest