Search results

Art, authorship and activism
Authors: Ian Scott and Henry Thompson

This book charts and analyses the work of Oliver Stone – arguably one of the foremost political filmmakers in Hollywood during the last thirty years. Drawing on previously unseen production files from Oliver Stone’s personal archives and hours of interviews both with Stone and a range of present and former associates within the industry, the book employs a thematic structure to explore Stone’s life and work in terms of war, politics, money, love and corporations. This allows the authors both to provide a synthesis of earlier and later film work as well as locate that work within Stone’s developing critique of government. The book explores the development of aesthetic changes in Stone’s filmmaking and locates those changes within ongoing academic debates about the relationship between film and history as well as wider debates about Hollywood and the film industry. All of this is explored with detailed reference to the films themselves and related to a set of wider concerns that Stone has sought to grapple with -the American Century, exceptionalism and the American Dream, global empire, government surveillance and corporate accountability. The book concludes with a perspective on Stone’s ‘brand’ as not just an auteur and commercially viable independent filmmaker but as an activist arguing for a very distinct kind of American exceptionalism that seeks a positive role for the US globally whilst eschewing military adventurism.

Open Access (free)
Ian Scott and Henry Thompson

the times and was symptomatic of a country clamping down on any alternative history. However, speculative and beyond easy confirmation these thoughts may have been, they still encapsulated something that Stone had been trying to say about the public accountability of corporate media organisations, and the undue influence (sought or unsought) of government in what gets reported, since he had first locked horns with the media nearly two decades previously. Corporations –​private and public –​their activities, and their tenuous accountability were stalking the back

in The cinema of Oliver Stone
Open Access (free)
The Queen in Australia
Jane Landman

‘The Southern Cross has vanished in the dawn. Over the city of Sydney, the brilliance of a summer’s day has broken. It is the third of February 1954. A day of high summer – and of high history for Australia.’ So opens the narration of the Australian government film The Queen in Australia (1954), describing the triumphal entrance into Sydney Harbor of the recently crowned

in The British monarchy on screen
Open Access (free)
Bryony Dixon

so-called ‘golden age’ of British cinema in the 1940s, but we tend go straight on to the 1960s and its ‘New Wave’ films. There is a vague sense of cosiness about the 1950s commercial films which were produced by the Rank machine or lacklustre government-sponsored ventures. A sense of mounting irrelevance resulted in the Angry Young Men/Free Cinema backlash, which is often strangely attributed to the

in British cinema of the 1950s
Screening Victoria
Steven Fielding

the heroic promise of the United States constitution. 3 Despite the supposed ‘presidentialisation’ of the role of British prime minister, those residing at Number 10 are still merely heads of government, closely tied to a political party, which usually holds a majority of seats in the House of Commons. 4 Therefore, those who want British politicians depicted in the same noble manner as Bartlet are not

in The British monarchy on screen
Mia-Marie Hammarlin

discours against the king, Mme de Pompadour, and the ministers. 9 May: The sieur Le Clerc for mauvais propos against the government and the ministers. 10 May: François-Philippe Michel Saint Hilaire for mauvais propos against the government and ministers. (Darnton 2005:34; see also Darnton 2010:50–1) It was arduous work to identify who had said what about whom, and many innocent people fell victim to the operations of the police. This did not prevent the number of arrests for bad speech from quickly increasing in number in the 1740s and thereafter. By means of a dense

in Exposed
Open Access (free)
Ian Scott and Henry Thompson

Thomas Anderson, Darren Aronofsky, Christopher Nolan and the Coen brothers, he still extended his artistic reach, consolidating himself both as a filmmaker that producers and production crews alike are keen to work with, and as a totem for a range of Left-​ leaning causes and critiques marshalled against the government and media. Indeed, while the veneration of the Hollywood establishment reduced, Stone’s auteur brand –​strengthened ironically enough by his political credentials –​actually increased in some overseas territories. Nevertheless, the commercial environment

in The cinema of Oliver Stone
Open Access (free)
Ian Scott and Henry Thompson

much of his career. In other words, his interest in developing a broader political critique of recent American history had found its initial register with Salvador. The film’s release may have been restricted, but it did pique the interest of some who remained ignorant of the US administration’s efforts to support regimes in Central America that were considered friendly to American interests, while engaging in subversion towards those governments that were perceived as hostile. Unfortunately –​both for the film’s backers and those who wanted the issues aired

in The cinema of Oliver Stone
Open Access (free)
Yale’s Chronicles of America
Roberta E. Pearson

machinations of Reds, or Bolsheviks, or anarchists, or strikers that were said to be menacing the Republic. The perceived threat to national values escalated during the immediate post-World War One years, the years of high profile industrial disputes and the Red Scare, responded to by elites in government and industry with both violence and the violation of civil rights. Labour supported the government’s war

in Memory and popular film
Open Access (free)
Ian Scott and Henry Thompson

greater indictment of the busted bankers and degenerate drug cartels. Certainly, Wall Street: Money Never Sleeps offered a tale of betrayal, vengeance and redemption in the wake of the 2008 financial crash; but it barely scratched the surface of the minutiae of short-​selling and mortgage-​backed securities any more than the original Wall Street had got to grips with insider trading. So while the public continued to nurse grievances about the 2008 financial meltdown and the beggaring of government resources to fix the problem, Wall Street: Money Never Sleeps was held

in The cinema of Oliver Stone