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Open Access (free)
Gareth Millward

immunisation 1991–2001’, Vaccine , 23:48–49 (2005), 5670–87. 12 Jane Lewis, ‘The prevention of diphtheria in Canada and Britain 1914–1945’, Journal of Social History , 20:1 (1986), 163–76; Linda Bryder, ‘ “We shall not find salvation in inoculation”: BCG vaccination in Scandinavia, Britain and the USA, 1921–1960’, Social Science & Medicine , 49:9 (1999), 1157–67. 13 Alex Mold, Making the Patient-Consumer: Patient Organisations and Health Consumerism in Britain (Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2015

in Vaccinating Britain
Open Access (free)
Gareth Millward

financial incentive to do so. The single vaccine, given in two doses, was also much more convenient. However, this system still required parents to choose to vaccinate. This caused problems during the MMR crisis itself. For while there was little counter information or other options available to parents, there was only one obvious choice. When the MMR–autism link became more widely talked about and an alternative action was considered possible – separate vaccinations – choice became a major issue. The rise of the rhetoric around choice and growing health consumerism meant

in Vaccinating Britain
Tinne Claes
and
Katrin Pilz

was a population of ‘health consumers’ or students training to be physicians. Storck’s efforts to promote these films were not exclusively grounded in the wish to better citizens’ health, but were also a strategical attempt to better his standing with national authorities and to secure his future career as a filmmaker. The transformation of the film medium into a channel of

in Medical histories of Belgium
Visualising obesity as a public health concern in 1970s and 1980s Britain
Jane Hand

people to interiorise health advice and show self-restraint,  26 while at the same time consuming more (albeit different) products to secure the continued success of the consumer society. Health consumerism demonstrated respect for the development of new diet markets and consequently the marketisation of nutrition and health itself. 27 In this process images were key. They repeatedly constructed and coded notions of acceptable health behaviour within established modes of

in Balancing the self
Open Access (free)
Gareth Millward

1970s’, in Matthew Hilton and James McKay (eds), The Ages of Voluntarism : How we got to the Big Society (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2011), pp. 114–34; Alex Mold, Making the Patient-consumer: Patient Organisations and Health Consumerism in Britain (Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2015). 36 On risk, see Chapter 4 and Ulrich Beck, Risk Society: Towards a New Modernity (London: Sage, 1992); Mary Douglas and Aaron Wildavsky, Risk and Culture (Berkeley: University of California Press, 1983); Jakob Arnoldi, Risk: An

in Vaccinating Britain
Open Access (free)
Gareth Millward

is concerned at the lack of statistics concerning vaccine-damaged children: believes that their case for compensation is at least as just as those children suffering as a result of the thalidomide tragedy; and demands an immediate investigation into the problem.’ HC Deb (3 December 1974) vol. 882, cc. 1514–26. 42 Mary McCormack, ‘The hazards of health’, Guardian (3 August 1973), p. 11. 43 Alex Mold, Making the Patient-consumer: Patient Organisations and Health Consumerism in Britain (Manchester: Manchester

in Vaccinating Britain
Open Access (free)
Teaching ‘relaxed living’ in post-war Britain
Ayesha Nathoo

C. Cederström and A. Spicer, The Wellness Syndrome (Malden, MA: Polity Press, 2015), p. 3. 97 www.hannapickard.com/responsibility-without-blame.html , accessed August 2019. 98 A. Mold, Patient Organisations and Health Consumerism in Britain (Manchester: Manchester

in Balancing the self
Martin D. Moore

, pp. 274, 272–5. 69 The Office of Health Economics was founded by the British Pharmaceutical Industry in 1962: W. Laing and R. Williams, Diabetes: A Model for Health Care Management (London: Office of Health Economics, 1989), p. 2. The Patients’ Association was created by a part-time teacher in 1963: A. Mold, Making the Patient-Consumer: Patient Organisations and Health Consumerism in Britain (Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2015), pp. 29–34. 70 ‘Inquiry is urged into hospital queues’, The Times , 13

in Managing diabetes, managing medicine
Martin D. Moore

in the Twentieth Century (London: Routledge, 2002), pp. 37–64; C. Sinding, ‘Flexible norms? From patients’ values to physicians’ standards’, in W. Ernst (ed.), Histories of the Normal and the Abnormal: Social and Cultural Histories of Norms and Normativity (London: Routledge, 2006), pp. 225–44. 8 A. Mold, Making the Patient-Consumer: Patient Organisations and Health Consumerism in Britain (Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2015). 9 A. M. Brandt and M. Gardner, ‘The golden age of medicine?’, in R. Cooter

in Managing diabetes, managing medicine
Martin D. Moore

). 7 A. Mold, Making the Patient-Consumer: Patient Organisations and Health Consumerism in Britain (Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2015), pp. 72–3; S. Sheard, The Passionate Economist: How Brian Abel-Smith Shaped Global Health Policy and Social Welfare (Bristol: Policy Press, 2013), pp. 233–9. 8 C. Webster, The Health Services since the War , vol. 2: Government and Health Care: The British National Health Service, 1958–1979 (London: HMSO, 1996), pp. 227–41, 399–414, 635–60. 9 Stacey, Regulating

in Managing diabetes, managing medicine