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Open Access (free)
Dana Mills

99 6 Dancing human rights We have seen that ever since Isadora Duncan entered the stage of political dance, various instances of sic-​sensuous have been performed on the stage of the argument by bodies contracting into themselves and releasing to other bodies, moving and being moved. Those bodies affirm their equality to other bodies –​whether the dancing bodies they intervene against, or bodies inhabiting other worlds that deem them unequal. From Martha Graham’s audiences who are uninvited spectators to the gumboot dancers in South Africa and the flash mob

in Dance and politics
Open Access (free)
Moving beyond boundaries
Author: Dana Mills

Dance has always been a method of self- expression for human beings. This book examines the political power of dance and especially its transgressive potential. Focusing on readings of dance pioneers Isadora Duncan and Martha Graham, Gumboots dancers in the gold mines of South Africa, the One Billion Rising movement using dance to protest against gendered violence, dabkeh in Palestine and dance as protest against human rights abuse in Israel, the Sun Dance within the Native American Crow tribe, the book focuses on the political power of dance and moments in which dance transgresses politics articulated in words. Thus the book seeks ways in which reading political dance as interruption unsettles conceptions of politics and dance.

Open Access (free)
Dana Mills

politics through the flash mob. I  discuss the tension between the aim to create a universal shared space for subjects to reclaim their bodies and the response of individual bodies, grounded in specific political embodied languages, to that goal. The sixth and final chapter discusses the relationship between dance and human rights. Throughout the book I  show that dance has transcended the geopolitical boundaries agreed upon in verbal language. In this chapter I argue that by affirming universal equality of all speaking subjects, dance can allow us to assert the idea

in Dance and politics
Open Access (free)
The dancer of the future dancing radical hope
Dana Mills

, arriving in Jerusalem, unravels a world in which there is equal respect for human rights, dignity and equality of all; a world in which human beings can express joy and pain through their bodies with no fear of oppression or of the silencing of their voices. The dancer of the future brings with her a new interpretation of humanity through dance. The performance of the argument nearly draws to a close and it is time to summon the interlocutors of this book for their curtain call. From Isadora Duncan, who wanted to dance the chorus, and proved that she was always red

in Dance and politics
One Billion Rising, dance and gendered violence
Dana Mills

cultural imperialism, even from the best intentions. The One Billion Rising movement has managed to create a global platform against gendered violence, albeit sometimes contrary to its founding message in words. In the next chapter I  push the reader–​spectator to explore further the tension between the universal and the particular, 98 98 Dance and politics the moving body and structures of violence, when I read the concept of human rights through dance. Thus the argument releases further from a shared sphere of activism and dissent into legal-​political frameworks

in Dance and politics
Writing on the body
Dana Mills

field 15 Moving beyond boundaries: writing on the body 15 substantially in his Exhausting Dance. All these texts will be discussed in the next axis of the argument. The edited collection Dance, Human Rights, and Social Justice diverges from the above sources in its wider international focus, and yet it limits its conceptual focus to issues around rights and right-​claims rather than politics more broadly. Nevertheless, it has substantially inspired the last chapter of this book. Set against the understanding of dance and politics that I  term the weak reading of

in Dance and politics
Paul Henley

that serves, as an intertitle declares at the end of the introductory film, as ‘a story of our times’. The origins of the ≠Khomani San land restitution project lay in a chance meeting in 1992, at a private game reserve not far from Cape Town, between Roger Chennells, a white South African human rights lawyer and Dawid Kruiper, a San elder, who at that time was scratching out a living selling handicrafts and posing for tourist photographs on the periphery of the game reserve. Kruiper told Chennells the story of his group's eviction from their

in Beyond observation
Open Access (free)
Ian Scott and Henry Thompson

that recurrent feeling of fighting Vietnam over and over. When President Barack Obama decided to open his second term in office with the nomination of two Vietnam veterans –​Senators On the campaign trail, Barack Obama lambasted the policies of George W. Bush that had made the US an international pariah –​ war and contempt for human rights. For us, part of the senator’s attraction as a candidate was that he promised transparency, opposed the Iraq war and repudiated militarism. So it is hard not to feel disappointed.80 P o l itics John Kerry and Chuck Hagel, as

in The cinema of Oliver Stone