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Open Access (free)
Coreen Anne McGuire

in the second decade of the twenty-first century. Professor Philip Alston (UN Special Rapporteur on extreme poverty and human rights) recently visited the UK and reported on the impact that the austerity measures implemented since 2010 had had on the disabled. One of the aspects of these measures that he repeatedly emphasised was the extent to which the system for claiming employment and support benefits (ESA) had been designed to be difficult . This was facilitated by the system’s ‘digital by default’ design, which he argued had been purposefully intended to

in Measuring difference, numbering normal
Open Access (free)
Coreen Anne McGuire

(however it is resisted by scientists and human rights campaigners) can act to essentialise social categories.’ 134 These essentialised social categories are all too often those associated with non-standard bodies. This is a reference class problem, and the threat represented by contested reference classes to the apparent objectivity of normalcy will be explained and further explored in Chapter 2 . In this context, measurement devices offered scientific objectivity but also offered a way to make the invisible visible . By this I mean not just invisible disability

in Measuring difference, numbering normal
Open Access (free)
Duncan Wilson

shorten life. 2 Despite the Select Committee’s conclusions, euthanasia remained a contentious and high-profile issue. This was due in no small part to the campaigns of terminally ill patients such as Diane Pretty, who suffered from Motor Neurone Disease and sought legal assurances that her husband would not be prosecuted for helping her commit suicide. Although Pretty lost her 2002 case at the Court of Appeal and the European Court of Human Rights, continuing support for the ‘right to die’ led Lord Joffe, a human rights lawyer, to try and get the House of Lords to

in The making of British bioethics
Open Access (free)
Paul Greenough, Stuart Blume, and Christine Holmberg

Discontents (Delhi: Orient BlackSwan, 2012). 37 H. Potts and P. Hunt, Accountability and the Right to The Highest Attainable Standard of Health (Colchester: University of Essex, Human Rights Centre, 2008). 38 R. G. Bernheim, J. F

in The politics of vaccination
Guerrilla nursing with the Friends Ambulance Unit, 1946–48
Susan Armstrong-Reid

speaking out against human rights violations and balancing cultural sensitivity, effectiveness and personal survival remain fundamental challenges of humanitarian nursing today. The voices of the China Convoy nurses still resonate. Notes  1 National Quaker History Archive (hereafter NQHA), Friends House, London (hereafter FHL), FAU (1939–46), China Convoy Records Temp MSS 876, box 10, Personnel files: Joan Kennedy Woodrow.  2 K. Cruikshank, ‘Education, history and the art of biography’, American Journal of Education, 107:3 (1999), 231–9.  3 Margaret Stanley’s private

in Colonial caring
Ana María Carrillo

of the Ruiz Castañeda and Zinsser Anti-Typhus Serum], Gaceta Médica de México , 66:3 (1933), pp. 123–32. 40 T. Taylor, ‘The Doctor's Trial and the Nuremberg Code. Opening Statement of the Prosecution, December 9, 1946’, in G. J. Annas and M. A. Grodin (eds), The Nazi Doctors and the Nuremberg Code: Human Rights in Human

in The politics of vaccination
Bonnie Evans

adopted by the UN General Assembly and initiated an international agreement on child rights that was the first of its kind, and which replaced all non-binding international declarations on child rights that had focused on children as passive recipients of care and charity. The creation of the 1989 Convention was the outcome of proliferating international agreements on human rights

in The metamorphosis of autism
The origins and endurance of club regulation
Duncan Wilson

, which came to light in 1962 and burst ‘the bubble of postwar optimism’ surrounding medical research.146 At the same time, in their reports on Thalidomide and other issues, the media adopted a more critical ‘watchdog’ stance in which they focused on social and ethical issues instead of deferring to professional experts.147 Criticism also reflected the emergence of a ‘new politics’ in the 1960s and 1970s, in which concerns over class identity and economic security were replaced by an emphasis on human rights and individual autonomy.148 Change was often driven by the

in The making of British bioethics
Duncan Wilson

comfort to those who would like to assume, that the clergy or other moralists can or should settle problems for the doctors … Physicians have an expertise and competence without which all non-medical discussion of the rights and wrongs of medicine will be in danger of becoming only wool-gathering.104 But Fletcher did pre-empt a central tenet of bioethics when he emphasised that doctors must respect their patient’s ‘human rights Ian Ramsey and ‘trans-disciplinary’ medical ethics 79 (certain conditions being satisfied) to use contraceptives, to seek insemination

in The making of British bioethics
A national ethics committee and bioethics during the 1990s
Duncan Wilson

’ 253 175 Ibid, p. 138. 176 Ibid, pp. 139–40. 177 Ibid, p. 3. 178 Ibid, pp. 144, 141. 179 Ibid, p. 73. 180 Ibid. 181 O’Neill, A Question of Trust, p. 83. Emphasis in original. 182 Although individual autonomy remained a component of ‘principled autonomy’, O’Neill argued that it should only be ‘one minor aspect’. See Ibid, p. 97. 183 Ibid, p. 158. 184 See, for example, Kennedy, ‘Preface’, p.  vii. See also Ian Kennedy, ‘Doctors, Patients and Human Rights’, in Kennedy, Treat Me Right, pp. 385–415. 185 Kennedy, ‘Consumerism in the Doctor

in The making of British bioethics