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‘Australia for the White Man’
Julie Evans, Patricia Grimshaw, David Philips, and Shurlee Swain

human rights, which might have protected the Aboriginal minority in a country progressively dominated demographically by a White majority that had shown itself hostile to their interests. 46 The Constitution identified Aborigines twice in discriminatory ways. First, it excluded Aborigines from being counted in population statistics, which meant they would not be counted for the distribution

in Equal subjects, unequal rights
Open Access (free)
Women, internal colonization and indigenous peoples
Katie Pickles

course of setting an example in human rights to other countries, on 19 January 1962 new immigration regulations were introduced that laid primary stress on education, training and skills as the criteria of admissibility to Canada, regardless of the country of origin of the applicant. Freda Hawkins has written that the new law was intended to remove racial discrimination as ‘the major feature of Canada

in Female imperialism and national identity
Open Access (free)
Sue Thomas

Britain a respect for ‘human rights and human needs’. 93 As Jan Pettman points out, ‘Human rights have long been associated with a western, liberal and individualistic approach to rights’. 94 Naipaul consciously represents his ideal of the individual as being grounded in ‘metropolitan assumptions about society: the availability of a wider learning, an idea of history, a concern with self-knowledge’. 95

in West Indian intellectuals in Britain
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One or two ‘honorable cannibals’ in the House?
Julie Evans, Patricia Grimshaw, David Philips, and Shurlee Swain

new constitutions contained no statement of human rights, and no specific entitlement for Aborigines to exercise the political rights to which they were formally admitted. The British ignored the fact that the vicious land-grab meant that Aborigines had been decreed to have no property rights, and therefore, under a franchise based on ownership or occupation of considerable property, no access to political rights. In a

in Equal subjects, unequal rights
Britishness, respectability, and imperial citizenship
Charles V. Reed

, they also participated in a broader struggle for human rights against the rising tide of racism and the ‘global colour bar’. 9 Scholars, however, have rarely presented these Western-educated people of colour in such light. Post-colonial and other area studies scholars have treated the historical actors presented here in skilful and sophisticated ways but struggle perhaps too diligently to excise them

in Royal tourists, colonial subjects and the making of a British world, 1860–1911
Sabine Clarke

expounded by the UN such as the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. This ambition was frustrated by officials from France and Britain, who rejected the suggestion of a closer relationship with the UN for potentially undermining their authority over their colonies and as an attempt by the US to force them to a timetable for granting independence. British officials only occasionally resorted to outspoken dissent in their meetings with other sections of the Caribbean Commission. They were often able to avoid making a commitment to new initiatives by

in Science at the end of empire
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Colonial subjects and the appeal for imperial justice
Charles V. Reed

circumstances.’ 97 During the debate, some MPs expressed sympathy with the delegation’s plight. In order to avoid stamping a ‘seal of racial inferiority upon the masses of the people of South Africa’ and committing Britain ‘to a new principle in local government and human rights’, Ellis Griffith, a Liberal MP and future Under-Secretary for the Colonies under Asquith, contended that ‘we

in Royal tourists, colonial subjects and the making of a British world, 1860–1911