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Pleasantville and the textuality of media memory
Paul Grainge

marginalisation of black, female, gay and radical ‘others’, 17 Pleasantville assimilates the terms of culture war debate that informed Gump ’s vision of family idealism, and that underwrote various elements of conservative rhetoric in the early 1990s. While Forrest Gump can be set in relation to the high-point of culture war discourse – a period where the 1960s were seen as the cause and origin of a more

in Memory and popular film
Robert Giddings

, Dickens’s revolution is totally devoid of any political idealism. Sydney Carton martyrs himself to save the skin of an aristocrat. The most memorable of the revolutionaries is Madame Defarge, whose zeal is motivated more by vengeance than the wish to make the world a better place. By the time we reach the sections where Monsieur Defarge and his followers at the wine shop are plotting to rebel, adding names to the

in British cinema of the 1950s
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Fixing the past in English war films
Fred Inglis

as a result not only of his quite amazing facility for learning foreign languages – at his death he spoke and read eleven – but of his luminous intelligence, his gifts as a poet, his striking high-mindedness and idealism, his strong sense of the comic. At Oxford in 1938, with Iris Murdoch as his sweetheart, he was, like all generous-hearted and public-spirited young men and women of his class, a

in British cinema of the 1950s
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Civil rites of passage
Sharon Monteith

protagonists undergo a rites of passage or racial conversion. Most white directors and screenwriters espouse a liberal reformist vision in working out private salvations. But as Martin Luther King Jr. opined in Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community? (1967), liberalism can be ‘all too sentimental concerning human nature’, leaning towards a ‘false idealism’. Films made in our own historical moment

in Memory and popular film
Open Access (free)
Ian Scott and Henry Thompson

during the decade. From the condemnation of Central American foreign policy in Salvador (1986), to the inexorable rise of ‘shock jock’ celebrity culture in Talk Radio (1988), by way of the financial ‘masters of the universe’ satire at the heart of Wall Street (1987), Stone took pot-​ shots at every angle of Reagan’s political philosophy. That the man left the White House in 1989 as one of its most popular ever incumbents, and that films such as Born on the Fourth of July seemed to capture for some audiences the essence of Reagan’s idealism (in as misguided a way as the

in The cinema of Oliver Stone